Wild Custom Paint, Kids Bikes & Components | Eurobike 2019 Part 4

Wild Custom Paint, Kids Bikes & Components | Eurobike 2019 Part 4


– And yes, it’s another day here at Eurobike 2019. The 12 halls, the two massive outdoor areas, full of tech and new bike stuff. We’re going to go and
find some more stuff. Check it out. I often reference Kona bikes on the GMBN Tech Show, on our weekly news show. This, of course, is that new Process 134. There’s various different
iterations of this, but the 29er is where it’s
all at for me, of course. 134mm travel out back. I mean, you don’t really
need much more than that. I keep saying this all the time, going to sound like a broken record, but less travel is more. You feel that terrain, you feel connected to what you’re riding, And the bigger wheels help you
get over some of those hits. Really impressive bike from Kona. Looks fantastic, geometry is really good. Single pivot linkage activated there. They’ve got it absolutely nailed. Now, I especially like this because it’s slightly bigger
travel then the Process 111, which was one of my
all-time favorite bikes. That, of course, was 29 inch wheel. It had 120 on the front, and it had 111 out back. People kind of looked at that bike, and I don’t think they understood it when Kona first released it. But it’s still, I’ve got to say, a bike that I hope that
Kona revisit in the future. And I think they might. Some of this stuff doesn’t
necessarily maintain. You’ve got to look after your bike, you’ve got to maintain your bike, which means you’re going to have to have some quality lubricants,
degreasers and that. And it’s all the stuff
we’ve always needed. WD-40, for example. It’s showing off their stuff. It’s a simple range, and it’s got everything you actually need to work on your bike. They’re demonstrating degreaser here, they’ve got water displacer, they’ve got wet lubes,
they’ve got dry lubes. That is the essentials you
need for working on your bike. And we’ve got some stuff from Race Face. This time, it’s some of
their new carbon wheels. So they’re 800 euros front, 900 euros rear, for a set. These are actually 36
mm carbon rims on here, so these are ideal if
you’re running wide trails, so 2.5, 2.6, or even up
to the bigger size tires if you really want to run them. They’re nice and light, they come in Boost, Super
Boost, all of that stuff. XD Driver and regular Shimano
Driver bodies on them. And you guessed it, as they’re Race Face, you can customize the decals on the rims. So you can go all in with
the color-coordination. It’s definitely something we
saw a lot of a few years ago, in particular with the whole
Enve and Santa Cruz thing, a lot of color-coordination
going on there. But it’s kind of tailed off a bit, but there’s definitely a theme of bringing colors back again here at Eurobike 2019. And of course, you know
us here at GMBN Tech, we love riders of the future,
the riders of tomorrow. Perhaps you’ve got kids, perhaps you are a younger rider yourself, in which case you’ll be looking
at something like these. So this is little Honzo 24. The Honzo is their 29 inch
wheel, trail XD type frame, but this is the kid-specific one. It looks amazing, a
little tan on the tires, everything is scaled down, it’s got proper wheel suspension forks. So none of that horrible heavy stuff, these are genuinely good
little suspension forks. Amazing paint job on there. And at the back they’ve got a little mini Process 24 as well, so that’s a full-suspension version. Little Manitou forks on the front. Look at this thing! This is so cool. Totally not overbuilt as well, so they’re doing it right. Along with Commencal,
and a few other brands that are really starting to
get into gear with kids’ bikes. I think we need to see more of this, and I feel like, somehow, we need to make a bit of a kids’ special, because there are some amazing
young riders coming up, and some amazing bikes for them to ride. Look at that! Imagine having that when
you were that small! Absolutely fantastic. Just everything about the little kids’ 24-inch Process is scaled down, so it’s got a lighter
tune on the shock here, so it actually works really well for kids. Same with the fork. Now, something I’ve just noticed, two little cool things, in fact. Firstly, I can see on my side, rooting for a dropper post, and that’s pointed out
to me by Gary from Kona, something quite cool. One of the problems with
kids and dropper bikes, obviously kids are a lot smaller, so the amount of drop they
need is quite limited. But thanks to the increase in XC posts and gravel posts coming out, like 60mm drops and even less than that, you’re going to be able to take
a proper dropper post on here that’s suitable for smaller-size legs. And take a look at those cranks. Something cool about those, they’re actually drilled
out slightly shorter, so they’re fitting kids. So it’s a proper crank, and
just shortened for kids, as opposed to purpose-build,
making the crank for kids. But there you go, job done. Awesome little kids’ bike. How about this for a bit of bike porn? This is a custom-painted Yeti. This belongs to Mr Muc-Off. That is Alex Trimnel, he owns the company, and he obviously lives
and breathes the brand. The bike is a 25-year special, so obviously the brand, now,
Muc-Off, is 25 years old. Used to be X-Lite back in the day, I think I’ve told that story
once or twice on the channel. But look at this thing, it’s absolutely dripping in bling. It’s got those carbon
Spengle wheels on there, and a full custom paint job. Absolute work of art. What do you think of this thing? Is this the craziest-looking
bike we’ve seen yet? So I’ve already checked out
the Manitou Mezzer fork. We saw this at Sea Otter Europe, and I know that Henry’s
a massive fan of this. Looks like an awesome fork, and you’ve got to bear in mind as well, it’s got the modern
classic graphics on it, so look a little bit like the
original Manitou graphics. But something that’s
actually cooler than these I’ve just spotted on the same stand here, is the new kids’ fork. So check this out. This is called the Machete J-UNIT, and this is a fully featured
kids’ suspension fork. Available in 20-inch and
24-inch compatible versions, internally adjustable
travel, 100 to 120 mm. Reverse arch on there, adjustable compression,
adjustable rebound, that is a proper kids’
suspension fork, at last. That is going to be making
a lot of kids very happy. And going along with that is another kids-specific component here. Classic Answer Pro Taper
bars here, basically. But look at the diameter of these! These are tiny, so these
are 15.5 millimeters, whereas normal bars would be 22.2. So that is a 22.2 Shim, so it can accept regular brake levers, but the grip size can be smaller, so the grip is actually a 22.2. Perfect for small hands. That is amazing, I love that. Loving the fact there’s proper
kids’ componentry coming out. J-UNIT. That’s the one to get. As you’ve probably noticed,
I am stood in front of a, or I’m stood behind in fact, another downhill bike. So this is the Phoenix Downhill bike. So this is the 29-inch wheel version. This is brand new. Moves around that DW-link system that Pivot bikes are quite
famous for, actually, for working with that
from the very beginning. It’s definitely one of the best
incarnations of this system. It’s compatible with coil
shocks, and with air shocks. 190 mm travel out back. Of course, it’s got the regular
Fox 40 up on the front here. Pivot seem to use and
work quite exclusively with Shimano and Fox, so it’s quite rare to see a bike not specced with this stuff. It’s also got this
Super Boost on the rear, so that’s 157, so a massive back end. And I got to say, in the flesh,
this thing looks amazing. Really nice, what do you reckon? Yet another new bike
from the stable of Pivot. So that is the new Firebird. 29-inch wheel, of course. Most people are diverting
towards 29-inch wheels, especially in favor of big
travel bikes these days. So that’s 162 on the back there, so quite a lot of travel for
a 29-inch wheel bike to have. Again, using that
DW-linkage system on there. Again, it’s the very
good incarnation of it that Pivot are really renowned for. So DW-links have got quite
a high anti-squat value, so really good for pedaling up that rough, aggressive terrain. You’re not going to get pedal strikes. The bike wants to stand up, but the way that they’ve managed to tweak the linkage system on here, is it’s very active still
on the smaller bumps, so you do get that traction. It just resists the wallow
that you do not want from a suspension bike
when climbing off-road. Carbon construction, it’s got loads of nice silencers built in. This is something we’re starting to see, actually, on a lot more bikes, is much better rubber incorporation
into the frame design. So out of the box, off the shelf, whichever way you want to put it, as soon as you get on
the bike, it’s silent. Really, as they should be. We don’t want our bikes
to be clattering around, and you certainly don’t want your chain to be taking away any
paint off that frame. Now, as far as the color
goes, my jury’s out. I think I like this. It’s kind of nearly a Blake Samson, olive, army-sandy-greeny-gray-type color. But I’m unsure, what do you
guys think of the color? Is this a good way to go? Do you like these tones, or do you like the lairier tones, or do you prefer black? Whatever it is, let us know
in those comments underneath. But I think I’d have one of these. I think it looks good. So the key to making your
suspension fork, or shock, work as fast and as slick as possible, firstly, is by keeping it clean. That’s from your side of
things, kind of maintenance. But from the manufacturer’s
point of things, it’s all down to the tolerance
of internal components. Now, MRP, they’ve been working away at basically making and
refining every single individual part that
goes into their forks. Now, their forks are
hand-assembled as it is, so they’re very meticulously put together, but this is really cool. This is something that they’re putting in all of their new forks now. So, this is an existing bushing set, so just sliding this up
and down on the shaft here. It’s really quite smooth,
but as you can see, it does stay in place
when I leave it there. Now, this is the new one. There is no friction there, and you don’t need to
be a genius to work out just how slick in action
that is going to perform out on the trail. That is going to be an
incredibly supple fork. So, that’s really cool as
a sort of a working update to what they’re already producing. Now, just above me here, you might also see this. What you can see here
is a Ramp Control unit. So this is sitting on
top of the fork here, little orange style as you can see. And the idea is, as well as adjusting air pressure in the fork, you can tune the Ramp Control
towards the end of the travel, how you want it to feel. In addition to that now, you can now add on
volume spacers to these. So you can completely change the air chamber
characteristics of the fork. Now, this one is exclusive
to this fork, the Bartlett. But you can actually do it now on the regular Ramp Control cartridges. So again, just to emphasize that, this is the dial that you
adjust that Ramp Control with. You inflate the air through into the fork, chamber goes straight in and this basically acts as a slave unit, and you can also add tokens on the bottom. So you can completely tune the way your fork feels by using that. More cool kit from MRP. Okay, so it does say eMTB, however, it is a Marzocchi Z2. I remember when these
first came out in 1997. It’s kind of cool to see them back. These are e-bike certified, and as the guys over on EMBN are going to be telling you very soon, there’s some changing come rules come in with the specifications of stuff that’s supposed to be used
in a high-load application. We’re not talking about the
intention of the product, we’re talking about the combined weight of the battery, the bike, the user, all the kit they’re carrying. It’s been noticed that e-bikes certainly are having a bit
more of an effect on products. So, one of these is going
to be e-bike certified soon, and you’re going to see this with more Marzocchi products
and more Fox products. My guess is the rest of the
market are going to follow suit. And this, thankfully, is the
normal mountain bike version of the Z2. Again, the Z2 originated back in 1997, and the original one had coil springs, so twin coil springs on there, and it had adjustable
compression and rebound on there. And it was an open oil bar fork. Alongside the Z1 Bomber, the Z2 was one of the
best forks ever made, certainly in that generation. It really changed the way
manufacturers approached. So I’m super-pleased to see this back. It’s available in loads
of different options now. So available in 27.5 inch compatibility, 29 inch compatibility, and up to 150 mm travel. So down to 100 mm travel there. And you’ve got different
offsets available. So stoked that they’ve teamed up with Fox to make all of this possible, and I love the fact that
Marzocchi genuinely is back. Well there we go, that’s
another day of tech-hunting here at Eurobike 2019. Checking out for today. Let us know what you loved
in the comments underneath. Don’t forget to give us a thumbs-up. Hit that notification bell, and every time we upload
another video, like tomorrow, you’ll get a little buzz
come up on your device and tell you. And for a couple more videos, click down here to see
what we found on day one, and click down here to see
what we found on day two. Eurobike, over and out. Ta-ta!

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