Welcome To My Studio – Helen Van Wyk – Oil Painting Lesson – S005_01

Welcome To My Studio – Helen Van Wyk – Oil Painting Lesson – S005_01


Hello. I’m Helen Van Wyk and welcome again to my studio. Yes, another three. Hue tone and intensity are the factors of color and if we become very acquainted with them, we’ll be able to mix color much better. Let me establish the composition. Why draw it? Just place it. Know where you’re going. Now that’s an easy thing to do, really. And then you can add to it another decision, the the shape and how its arranged in relation to the rest of the objects. I move this in to the picture so that if you looked at that your eye would go to here. I wouldn’t have that little thing shooting out of the picture. And this. It has a fat bottom and it’s kind of Flat-chested. And it has a top. Now… The hue of a color… is which way the color tends. Meaning orange can be either yellowish or reddish. And so I look at this copper pot and say yes, it’s orange. But it’s not yellowish. It’s quite reddish, so I look at my palette and I see my options. I have this orange and this red. I have this orange and this red. And I have this dark orange over here. And this murky red. And so my mixture is going to be started out with one of those. But then I have the other personality of color and that is intensity. That means how bright or dull. Now this copper pot is not the color of a tangerine or a navel orange or or the color we think of as orange, like the orange marigolds in our garden. It’s a duller orange so that rules out these two. And I look at these and it doesn’t even look like that. But this one down here, burnt sienna. If I pull that over on my palate… It’s an orange, and it’s dull, so it might the beginning of that copper pot. So I’ll try it out. Always try a color out. Surely you who are watching this demonstration, can help me paint it. What do I have to do to that color to make it look more like the copper? I think I have to lighten it. And you do too, I bet. And so, I’m going to put some white in it and try it out. Now it doesn’t look quite red enough. So I’m going to add a red. Any red. Aha that’s good. So now I’m going to mass it in, in this general overall orange color that is medium tone dull in intensity. Now the onions are also in the orange family. But what’s the difference between this orange and onion orange? I think in comparison the onion orange looks yellower than this kind, so it’s a difference of hue. So out of this color… might as well take it out of here, so they like each other here if they join together here first. So I’m going to put more yellow in that and see if… well I’ll be…look at that…maybe… that looks close enough. Basically, it’s always good to start from one general overall basic value. Don’t try to do it all at once. I’m looking for just tone…light or dark. Intensity…bright or dull. or the hue of orange. Hue meaning how it tips toward red or toward yellow. The white of the onion is negotiable. Well since it’s going to be in an all-over orange composition, I have to make it orange, too. Why? If I make it any other color it’s going to be the most extraordinary thing in the picture. Grayed down dull… orange off-white. Really you’re quite safe working mono-chromatically. Mono, meaning one and chroma meaning color. So this is a composition of one color. But with vast variation. And so this is an orange, but very very dark and quite yellowish. I’m concentrating on having your attention directed to the hue tone and the intensity of color. I don’t paint pictures just to have you watch me paint pictures. I use pictures to try to teach you something that I think is important enough to know, to be able to be a self-sufficient craftsman at painting. If you just emulate what I do, you’re gonna need me forever. Well. Maybe I maybe that’s kind of nice but, if I teach you what I know, you can fly on your own. How more homogeneous the background color is in relation to the colors I’ve already put down… …now that it (the background) is also a tone of of orange. But I can really get it quite gray by mixing the orange into a lot of black and white. Yes, now we’re acquainted with hue tone and intensity, the three personalities of color, we have to amalgamate that with the other three that we know about and that is that everything is made of the three primary colors, red, yellow and blue. Well orange happens to be a mixture of yellow, and red. What happens to blue? We have to use blue too, and so we use blue to diminish the orangeness of the color wherever we know that the orangeness can’t show. So we take the basic mixture, let’s say the basic mixture of the copper, orange, and put a little bit of blue, which is known as its complement. Yes, that’s the color of the shadow. How did I mix it? I made the orange darker with more orange and then added the complementary blue to dull it Sometimes you actually can see the appearance of a complementary color. But on copper I can’t. These shadows appear wherever the light is not showing off coppers magnificent orangeness. And it’s quite dark. Quite bluish right in there. That’s an under plane. See it’s under and so it can’t be light. The light can’t turn and get down there. And under here. This is a little bit under too and so it gets darker there. But how about those highlights? They look very orange! And they look very much brighter in intensity than the orange that I have. So it’s very light, and it’s very bright and so to mix the color of the highlight I take white for its lightening and for its brightness I use the orange and red of the brightest type I have. And I quickly mix it. Quickly mix it. Don’t grind the living daylights out of it. Look how much brighter that looks than this. And pile…pick up the paint on the end of your brush so that you can pop the highlights on. The highlight hits on the apex of the concavity and convexity in line with the light. There’s a convexity and here’s a con. No, that’s a concavity. Here’s a convexity. I put the highlight on bigger than I see it so I can mush it in. Everyone says “Oh, you get everything so blended, and I don’t”. But they’re afraid to push these colors together because they think they’re gonna ruin it. And I say to them, well you don’t have anything to lose. Why don’t you try? Why don’t you try to make a mess? Likely to be the most wonderful mess you’ve ever made! You can’t predict. You just have to try. You can’t even predict what’s gonna happen to you tomorrow. How can you predict what’s going to happen to the copper pot? If you don’t really give it a chance. Oh wow. Look at how that starts to shine with a lighter brighter orange. And how about the background? Yes, It’s in the orange family. But it’s rather drab looking. It doesn’t seem to be doing anything. In fact, because I did paint it in a duller orange, and it turned blueish in relation to this bright orange, it looks that way. But I’d like to really make it look as though the light is striking that. So I’m going to use, not orange, but an orange that goes very yellowish to make the light look as though it’s hitting over here. And then I see that cast shadow. Well on that background the cast shadow would be also kind of blue…kind of blue. Not because of the pot but because it’s an orange background and that’s kind of blue. That cast shadow just comes right to the tip of the onion and that’s called a kiss. So I’m going to move the cast shadow to where I think it’s more advantageous. My picture…I can do anything with it that what I want. As long as it records some of my better thoughts and I like to make the background a little darker where the light comes from. After all, the background has to look as though it’s air. That’s the magic of a realistic painting. Not that it looks real. It looks airy. It looks dimensional. Because we can look at photographs that are realistic, but they don’t look like the kind of real the paintings look. And now the onions… Notice how Helen clears a spot with a cloth to get a clean highlight. The highlight on onions are so white that they don’t look orange. Not like copper. And whenever you see something seemingly colorless on a color, you have to use the colors complement, and so I’m going to use, not actually blue, but probably a violet. Just a cooler version. A cooler color than orange. So here’s the highlight And here’s another highlight. Big oh yeah. Nice and big. And now cut it down with the color you see around it. It’s like the investment business. I’m investing a lot of paint on that highlight. So I can reap some dividends out of the investment by going the opposite way. Oh, well that wasn’t it was a clunker, but anyway. That’s a nice little relief over there where that onion has been broken away, and we see some green coming through…and lighten the white. Rhythm of application suggested by the texture. Read it as paint. And of course we have to deal with the table too. It has shadows. It has one of the most important shadows that is offered to us by lighting and that’s the cast shadow. These shadows on the onion, by the way, are also in the blue family. Very dark right here. And blue into dark orange for the cast shadow…to make them their little bottoms sit down on the table. The cast shadow is also a nice tone value to pull the subject together. Makes all the things look as though they’re part of a theme. Not just sitting there ignoring each other. Now this is a thing that you must always take into consideration, and I see this mistake a lot. People paint a nice light background and then a very dark table, but most tables do have some kind of texture that allows them to shine and so the table has to be influenced by the background color because it reflects it. …Very shiny. You would end up actually seeing a repeat of the object. Meaning this and then this and then that would be reflecting in it. Whenever you set up a still life. Make sure you have the right tone background against the subject so that you can see its influence. So we’ve learned all about hue tone and intensity. Those very three important properties of color. Another three. Another three in painting. You only have three choices to make. People, places or things. Isn’t it amazing with that limitation that we come up with so many different types of paintings. So that’s what I’m going to show you next time or well, well, maybe I will teach you how to make soup.

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