Watercolor Quickie: Wet on wet painting – Morning Fog

Watercolor Quickie: Wet on wet painting – Morning Fog


Hi, this is Eric from Café Watercolor. And welcome to another quickie video and let’s
just jump into it. So this painting is based on a photo that
I took earlier this year at the end of the winter when I drove to work. It’s just another cloudy, foggy morning was
a wet road, very typical morning scenery in the Pacific Northwest during the winter, but
that also makes a beautiful subject to paint. And this will also be one of the few painting
that I actually use… the masking flew at because I want a lot of
big clean washes so I don’t have to paint around those tiny shapes when I paint. So as you can see, when I started my first
wash, I can just paint those shape over and knowing that those masking fluid will do the
job of preserving those tiny little highlights there So the first wash basically just really clean
wash from light to dark and then light to dark again the ground. And then after it’s dry I start the second wash. Second wash is basically the background, the
background trees and it’s actually very fun when you start to look at it sped up because
you see how the water flow in, how they’ve resolved themselves when they dry. So the huge thing of this painting is wet
on wet. So the way to create this sort of depths and
the distance in a misty distance is to make sure you pre-wet the area and then you put the
paint into the wet area so they were spread out the water would run and it will just
create this beautiful misty feeling. And as it get to the foreground you started
darken them. And then when that is dry, I start to work
on the foreground trees and they are darker and it’s still one big shape. You can see that I pay quite a bit of attention
on the silhouette of the tree because it’s a foggy day and everything sort of just covered
by the atmosphere. But what’s really important is for people
to recognize what this is, is the silhouette. So you can see I pay quite a bit of attention
on the silhouette of the tree. And just because I paint loosely doesn’t mean
I don’t put any care into the shape of the leaves of the tree and stuff. And I think that attention to the brushwork
is what really sets some great artists apart, those very delicate brushwork that you can
tell that this artist is very experience and they put in a lot of care into those and those
brushstroke has character into them. And I just very quickly before or the dark
paints are dry, just started to wet the surface of where to reflection will be and it started
dropping those dark paints to make the reflections. And as you can see I just kind of let it go
and that the watercolor do its work. And that’s what always excites me when I paint
watercolor is because I can never know what the end product is going to look like. I could have an idea how it’s going to look
because I’m more or less familiar with the medium itself. But to predict exactly how it will look is
pretty much impossible because there’s a lot of factors and that can frustrate a lot of
people because a lot of people want this control over watercolor and they want it to behave
exactly what they want, which is not the right medium for you if that is what you’re expecting
because the strengths of watercolor is this freshness and this liveliness and that is
something that you need to embrace. So let it flow that it bleed and let it paint
itself for you and all watercolor need is some good guidance that you provide. Dropping the headlight and the taillight with
gouache while they are still wet so it gives this soft glow and the mist, which is what
you see when it’s a misty foggy day because the light diffuse in the atmosphere and as
you can see when I paint the left trees, I bring those value into the car in the left
because that’s what brings the painting together. Now I paint the reflection of the tail light
and the headlight on the ground. And I add some more misty background trees
on the left because the value transition is a little bit too abrupt. So making a back ground tree on the left a
little bit darker makes the transition a little bit more natural. So this is my second quickie video and if
you have any question about painting or just me in general, feel free to leave to common. And I will try to answer that in the next
quick video if I can. And as I mentioned in my other video, my monthly
video, will take a pause on August because I’m preparing my online course, but I’ll still
put out some quickie videos in between for you. And here’s the finished painting. It’s a very simple but hopefully effective
misty morning painting in the Pacific Northwest. I hope you enjoyed that and I will see you
next time.

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