[Theory] – Colour Cohesion and Placement for Miniature Painting

[Theory] – Colour Cohesion and Placement for Miniature Painting


Hi guys, welcome back. Something a bit different
today. So this video is going to be showing a simple
way to space out your colours and also how to get those working together so that your
model has a solid cohesive look. We’re going to use this miniature here, now
I painted this a while ago and there’s a few things I’m not 100% happy with for example,
in some of the areas I could have pushed the contrast more and to be honest that gold corset
was a huge mistake. But I think overall it works quite well. Anyway (lols) The first and probably the most important
thing is to keep your palette quite limited. Don’t go nuts and use you know, a hundred
different paints. Just try and stick to a core of about 10 or so. So with that in mind here’s all the colours
I used for this model. Purple and Green are going to be our two main
colours everything else is just window dressing. So, how do we decide which colours go where?
I use an idea that we’ll call the ‘rule of three’ Now it’s actually more of a guideline than
a rule, but to be honest the guideline of three doesn’t sound as cool as the rule of
three so… Ideally what you want is to have each main
colour evenly spread across your model in three different areas. Now this is very much dependant on the model
so sometimes you’ll have to use two areas instead of three. So if you look at the model, you can see that
I’ve used the purple in three points, so around the neck, draped over the arms and
the trim of the dress. The green that I’ve used in the dress is also
used in the gemstone on the hair piece. I could have used the same green in the shoulder
pads to give the three points of colour but I decided to go with white just to make it
a bit more interesting. White doesn’t really clash with anything so
you can use it as an incidental colour or just whenever you feel like giving the middle
finger to the rule of three. You can use it basically anywhere you want. Within reason. In order to make the colours work across the
whole model this is going to sound weird but bear with me. What you want to do is use the base colour
from one area, and use that as the highlight for another colour. And we’ll use the same sort of idea for the
shadows. So. if we’re taking this model as an example
the purple scarf was highlighted using the same paint that I used for the flesh. The black highlights were made by adding some
of the blue from the vial on her hip. The purple was shaded with that same blue
paint. The gold corset, the green dress and the skin
were all shaded with the base colour of the hair So when you’re looking at the model, there’s
not one area where I haven’t used the same paint to do another section. Now, this delves into colour theory, which
is a massive topic so I’m going to do a separate video showing how you know which colours go
together. Hopefully I’ll be able to get that out quite
soon. So hopefully that ramble was understandable,
if you experiment with this sort of idea it should become more clear. I hope this was helpful to you, em, if you
have any questions at all, just leave a comment down below and I’ll do my best to get back
to you as soon as possible. If you enjoyed this don’t forget to hit like
and share it really helps the channel grow. Ah, yeah! So thanks for watching. And bye for now…

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