Pastel painting techniques & portrait painting tutorial with Christine Clark I Colour In Your Life

Pastel painting techniques & portrait painting tutorial with Christine Clark I Colour In Your Life


G’day viewers, my name is Graeme Stevenson and I’d like to invite you to come on a journey of creativity and learning and adventure through the series Colour In Your Life. There’s an artist in every family throughout the world, and lots of times there’s an artist deep down inside all of us as well. So grab your kids, your brothers, your sisters, your aunties, uncles and mums and dads, and come and see how some of the best artists in Australia do what they do. (Music Plays) Okay guys, we’re in Buderim today and another great and exciting show coming up on Colour In Your Life. I’m with a master pastelist Christine Clark. Welcome Graeme, thank you. Thank you darling. Christine, fabulous, fabulous artist works in the Mooloolaba Sunshine area. It’s a beautiful area isn’t it? It is. Sunshine Coast is just gorgeous. Fantastic place. Christine’s really well known for a number of different things with your work aren’t you? Yes. It’s not just, we’re going to be doing some fantastic piece today. It’s going to blow you away. She’s doing a 1920 series of ladies that have got vibrant colours in them in portraiture, which is going to be really exciting. But you do do a lot of other things. Like the beach scenes. This one just behind us for a start. Yes, that’s right. It’s just a beautiful piece. I love the way that Christine has this really loose effect with pastels. Some people can get really tight, but your expression over that whole piece you can see the lines as they come in and out. It’s fabulous. Tell me a little more about your history and your work I have been painting and drawing since I was a little girl. It’s been nearly thirty-five years I’ve been painting for. Wonderful. Thant’s fantastic. Yeah. And you’re a multi award-wining artist as well. I mean you’ve got this litany of prizes that you’ve won for your work. John Anderson one of our famous politician’s owns your work as well. Yes that’s correct. It’s quite amazing what you’ve done. But we’re going to dive into this today. This is really exciting. I mean there’s a lot of vibrancy and colour in what Christine does. And this is a series that she’s putting together on ladies. And you’re planning on doing a whole bunch of these through the great clothe area I guess you could say… Yeah. …of the 20’s and 30’s and 40’s. Yeah. And this is what I love to do. But this is, and it’s going to be a really interesting exercise as well, it really demonstrates the great ability that Christine has, but we’re going to go and create this roaring 20’s special I suppose you could say. CHRISTINE Yes. And then spend the rest of the day with Christine putting this together. So come along for the ride it’ll be fantastic. Okay Christine, now you’ve got a fabulous set up there with a number of women’s faces. One of them being your beautiful daughter’s. And then you’ve already made a start on this particular piece. Now how does all this reference to each other? How do you use all this together? Well I sort of decided that the 1920’s was bright and happy so I thought red. Why not a red background to start with. And when I talk to my students I say to them and it sounds a bit gruesome I know. But if you’re doing human form, and I love doing human form, that if you peel the layers back of the skin, the closer you get to the blood. And here we have red so we’ve got that, we just need to build on that. So that’s what makes it exciting I think. I start off generally by choosing a subject. And today I’ve chosen my daughter Sharon. And I actually put tracing paper over and I sketch the lines for where the nose, mouth and eyes come. So its the lower lid, the top lid, the eye ball, the actually eyebrows, the hairline, the chin, where the bottom of the lip is, the top of the lip, So after I’ve done that, then I work out how large it will need to be with my proportional divider, which is right here. Okay. So I take for instance, perhaps the length of the nose. This is set on the golden mean 1.6 and then the other end will show me the length of the nose. Oh okay. So I wanted to go back into the 1920’s so I use reference material from the internet and Carol Lombard’s hair was just gorgeous so I thought I’ll just try that. But I do need to go into these beautiful warm caramel colours and this is Melissa George, so she is an actress, an Australian actress. Absolutely. Love it.
Love it. Absolutely. That’s fantastic. Love it.
Love it. Love it. And then I research and find something that I would like to dress her in. Yeah. So the background is red acrylic that’s had three layers of Matisse China Red. Okay. And I use a roller to put it on with. Yeah. So we can start now. I like to wear a glove when I’m doing pastel. I find that it stops, well one thing, some of the pastels are toxic. Not very many of them but some of the reds and things like that.
I find that it stops, well one thing, some of the pastels are toxic. Not very many of them but some of the reds and things like that. So we can start now. I like to wear a glove when I’m doing pastel. Okay. I find that it stops, well one thing, some of the pastels are toxic. Not very many of them but some of the reds and things like that.
I find that it stops, well one thing, some of the pastels are toxic. Not very many of them but some of the reds and things like that. I find that it stops, well one thing, some of the pastels are toxic. Not very many of them but some of the reds and things like that. And so I like to use a glove and it keeps the hands clean but sometimes it gets a bit too hot to use the glove. I just cut a few of the fingers off and just use a couple of the fingers. There you go. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal. Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in.
So you’re just really, really getting that darkness out of the picture as much as you can? Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal. Yeah. I want a ghostly image but I don’t necessarily want all that information. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Yeah. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. I’m just getting a few reds and pinks. Now you would think there is enough on here already. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Yeah. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. But we’re going to put a few more. I scribble; I like to scribble. I think it’s good to have a nice scribble. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. And really you’re just building form with this. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Yeah. I’m just going to put in a few of the darker shades. You probably can’t see this so I might just go in to… This is the charcoal. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Yeah. So this is an old shaving brush that use to be my father’s in the Air Force. I’m just going to use that to take the charcoal.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Then I get the eraser and I take a little bit out here and there. Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in.
Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. Put her eyebrow in and a little bit of dark on the nostril. I’m going to put a little bit of the eye in. So I’ve got to look closely at Sharon’s eyes and see where I can put this pupil in. So as a portrait artist, is it important for you to have the eyes in first of all or? Very, very close to it. Yeah. I love putting them in. I think it’s the mirror to the soul. And for me I love the eyes to work and I know if they work then most of it comes together. Sure. And actually you’ve got somebody to talk to as you do the painting. Absolutely. In any essence what actually really drew you to the portrait from the other work? I just love figures. I don’t care if it’s a portrait or a full figure. And I love people doing things. I think it tells a story. And I love little kids, little chubby two year olds, so cute. So I’ve been doing them for a very long time. You really do have some fantastic pieces. Particularly the kids. I love the works you do with children at play. The emotion that you put into your work is wonderful. Thank you, I just love the kids. I’ve got six grandchildren and I’m constantly doing them. So I’m just going to put a bit of eyelashes and stuff like that. It’s not for any reason other than it just gives me a place to work from. Sure. And I like working all over, all over. Oh okay, you don’t just go from left to right. No. Which I think is a more sensible idea anyway. Yeah. My teacher who I was with for eleven years, Paul McDonald Smith, he was President for the Victorian Artists Society. He was fantastic, he said ‘if you’re going to use a colour and you use it down here, find somewhere else to use it’. Fair enough. Balance the picture. Yeah. You need that balance. It has to have that balance. You’re one of those ladies that really traveled the country a lot working with other well-known artists as well. Picking up information, doing workshops. I mean. Yeah. You’ve been with some quite well known people. I certainty have. Yeah. I think I went to Robert Wade seven times. Okay. And he is a watercolour artist and you know, top of his tree. Yeah. Beautiful man. I’m still just mapping. Still finding my way in the work. So I’m putting on some lighter areas just to show me where the light sits. I’m going to do her eyes now. Okay. I want to get a few soft colours. Now Sharon has greeny-grey eyes. But my theory is you put the bright colours on before as you can always dull them down. But you can’t get them back. Okay. You’re just really dabbing the pastel on. Yes, just dabbing it on. Just little dots. Okay. And then always referring back to your material as well? Always. Always, yeah. Yeah it’s a great idea to have that there like that. Well to get the eyes right you’ve got to get the expression. They’re pretty electric looking eyes. Yeah, sure are. They look a bit scary. Actually when I do my portrait classes, one of my students she says to me, oh my God she said, it looks like a werewolf before it looks like a person. Because I have these scribbles all over it. But that’s a good point. A lot of people try and finish a work before it’s even started. Yeah. It’s building up all those different layers that gets you there. It sure is. I love the use of the red underneath. There’s something about that. I mean some people use neutral grey, white but that red makes it quite dynamic. Yeah, I think so. So you’ve already started and it’s dynamic. Yeah. Now I’m going to put the whites of the eyes, which you may be interested to know are not white. It is called Jacaranda. It’s an Art Spectrum colour. I like the red. I think its looks great. You would teach a lot of this colour theory in your workshops too?
I like the red. I think its looks great. You would teach a lot of this colour theory in your workshops too? Now I’m going to put the whites of the eyes, which you may be interested to know are not white. It is called Jacaranda. It’s an Art Spectrum colour. It’s quite beautiful for the whites of the eyes. So now she doesn’t look quite… devil like I guess. I like the red. I think its looks great. You would teach a lot of this colour theory in your workshops too?
I like the red. I think its looks great. You would teach a lot of this colour theory in your workshops too? I like the red. I think its looks great. You would teach a lot of this colour theory in your workshops too? Yes I do. Yeah. Yes I do colour workshops number one and a colour workshop number two. It’s mainly the colour wheel and complimentary colours. And also then we go into tertiary in the next session and it’s fun. It takes a teacher with skill like yours to be able to teach that stuff. Oh, I’ve got a lot of years behind me haven’t I? Absolutely. And a lot of beautiful teachers you know. A lot of wonderful people out there that have taught me a lot and I just like to pass this sort of thing on. That’s fantastic. It makes art exciting. It does. And puts some Colour In Your Life. Something like that yes. I’m just going to put a little bit of the actual colour that I used up here for the eye just in for the teeth. Right now we’re going to do some hair. Better give her some her. It’s a completely foreign word to me. We’ll do the shape of this one. Okay. Which is very 20’s isn’t it? Very. Very 1920’s. I’m looking at colours that are in here but the same as what I did with the eyes. I have to put warmer colours underneath. I can always calm them down but I can’t get them back. Sure. Now I’m just going to do the headband, which will run across the forehead here. So I use my little soft paintbrush… Yeah. And I will just take this area out across there. Use the knead-able eraser and just remove it. Coming on. That’s right. I’m just going to put a little bit of the charcoal in here as the shadow. A little bit up here and across the headband. There you go. I can feel a roaring 20’s just coming roaring back on right now. Coming on. That’s right. I’m just going to put a little bit of the charcoal in here as the shadow. A little bit up here and across the headband. And as you might know by now, I love colour. Oh I can see that. It’s like the whole house is like a giant rainbow. Now with this roaring 20’s avenue that you’re going down, which I think is very exciting. You’ve also traveled a great deal as well. And I’ve noticed that you’ve got some really fantastic Venetian shots as well from the masks, the masquerade, the stores… Yeah. …and obviously the canals, some of the beautiful Venetian canals. It’s stunning, absolutely beautiful. Fantastic place isn’t it? Beautiful yeah. I’ve noticed one of the shots you’ve got there, I’ve been to Venice a few times myself, but I think its one of the canals that goes past Marco Polo’s old home? That’s absolutely stunning and the history, oh my God the history. Yeah, stunning.
Yeah, stunning. That’s absolutely stunning and the history, oh my God the history. Yeah it’s amazing isn’t it? Yeah, stunning.
Yeah, stunning. Yeah, stunning. Yeah, its amazing isn’t it? Goes back hundreds of years. You’re really just sort of continuing to build… …to those lighter regions the whole time? Yeah, that’s all I’m doing. Yeah I’m just building one colour over the other to pull it out. I keep going back with the charcoal to find… Fine tune… …where I’m going. Yeah. At one stage you owned your own gallery? Yeah the Blue Dolphin Gallery. Blue Dolphin Gallery. A few of us went in. There were four of us and we had a great time for seven years. It was fantastic. We had a lot of our own local artists, Sunshine Coast artists. And people use to come from all over Australia and sometimes the world. And we would post paintings out or they would take it under their arm and they’d buy one nearly every year. That’s fantastic. They loved it yeah, and they loved the local artists and all the local scenes and wildlife and stuff, yeah. Fantastic. Yeah that’s great, great, and you’ve obviously accelerated your career well beyond that once again. Yeah, yeah. I’m just going to put some light colours now on the skin to help bring this up again. Now obviously we have to go and do something about the eyebrows and the teeth. The thing about teeth is you really don’t fill in all the teeth. It’s just a suggestion. It is a suggestion, yeah. Handy charcoal. I will correct this but at the moment I’m just putting the gum line in. It’s just the top part. Just the top part of the gum. I do use a pencil. I also use these pan pastel applicators. And they come in all sorts of different shapes and sizes. When you want to want to just dull off the outside of the eye, the white of the eye, because it isn’t as white. Then you can just touch it with that… Oh right. And it’ll take it down a tone. Well apart from the fantastic landscape and seascapes scenes that you do around this area, you’re versatile enough with your creativity, I think this is probably more due to Mark your husband, who has a great love for cars as well. You’ve actually painted a number of cars or pastel a number of cars; Ford Falcon GTH – which looks fantastic for all those car enthusiasts out there, and also the Holden Monaro and a number of others as well. Yeah. Do you like doing them? A Jaguar. I didn’t mind doing them but it was his idea. I sort of rather do figurative work but what can you do? The man loves cars so… But as I said I mean your versatility is pretty amazing. You’ve got some fantastic yachting shots that you’ve done as well. And I love the looseness. It’s just a suggestion in a lot of your work of what’s actually there. And all of a sudden you step back, as you do a lot, and the picture falls into place. And it just comes together. It’s wonderful, it’s a great skill to have. Oh thank you. I really enjoy doing it. I love being able to just be really loose and just scribble. Yeah, fantastic. Now with your workshops, which I know are very popular on the Sunshine coast. I mean you’ve got a large following of very enthusiastic students. But what are the things you try and emphasize to them most of all when you’re obviously teaching them? I guess not to be afraid. Hmm. And I guess watching them paint, I love it, watching them paint because they get so surprised by what happens. And then I get so excited, ‘oh good we can do this’. That’s what I just love about it. That’s great. Well an enthusiastic teacher ends up with enthusiastic pupils. Yes. I guess we have some fun, we sure do. That’s the main thing. It’s a really handy little tool that. Fantastic.
Fantastic. That’s the main thing. It’s a really handy little tool that. Oh this is great. Fantastic.
Fantastic. Fantastic. And they’re just different shaped sponges are they? Yeah, and so if you’ve got to get into a tight spot, well then you just get in… All the little nick knacks. …and fix the corner of it . Now we’re going to put bling on. Love the bling. All us girls love the bling. So here we go, pearlised ink. Pearlised ink. And I also, I might as well put this out. This is Metallic Light Gold. Okay. As well. A light, light gold. Light gold for the center of the flowers. Okay. So dipping a little bit in and placing it over the petals. So I’ll put it on all the petals and then I will put the gold in the center. I also need to put a bit of it around the edge of the band on her hair. Actually I think because of the nature of the stuff that you use it’s got some sort of metallic base in it so you can see it shining. Yeah I love that. Yeah you can probably see it from across the room when you walk in. And at night when the lights are down you can generally see it. The shine as it comes through… irredentist. This is where I think your play with imagination comes in. Yes. You can sort of just about design everything that you wanted to do. Yeah I do. And its fun. Yeah. Really fun. Playing dress ups. There you go. And designing your own jewelry. Now Christine you’re in a number of galleries in the Sunshine Coast area. Now folks can see your work at Gallery Beneath at Mooloolaba. Yes. At Art Nuno at Buderim and Raw Art gallery outside of the Sheraton Noosa and Hearts and Minds in Tewantin. So you’re in quite a few galleries as well. Yes. Yes I am And I think the thing is when you look at your work, I mean you really capture these precious moments of every day life and of people. And I think that’s probably the most appealing part of your work your audiences just love to see the humanity in what you do. Well thank you, Graeme. Yeah I really enjoy it. I love people, love painting them. Fantastic you do a marvelous job. Thank you. Alright guys, well another fantastic day. We brought the roaring 20’s back to life today so it was just amazing. Christine, thank you. Thank you so much. We loved watching you work. And I’m sure the audience got a great deal out of this very talented human being. Now your website is? christineclark.com.au. Come in and have a look. There’s some really, really emotive works that Christine has in her site and some fantastic stuff of the coast and landscapes. Really, really well done. Also once again you can come to colourinyourlife.com.au. Come in and have a talk to us. There are thousands of people in there these days. We are getting millions of hits on YouTube so the show is really crossing the globe these days, and doing some amazing things. Fantastic. Because of talented people like this. And also our Facebook page as well, just come in and like us on Facebook. Always once again, thank you. Roaring 20’s brought to life. I think this is just amazing this stuff. Can you imagine the backgrounds with greens and purples? Yes. I think that’s great. And we’re going to Put Some Colour In Your Life. Until we meet again, remember, make sure you Put Some Colour In Your Life. Put Some Colour In Your Life. We’ll see you next time guys. Bye now. Bye Bye.

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