Painting a Scale Model ASMR

Painting a Scale Model ASMR


Hello I felt like trying something different. I thought it might be interesting for you to see my painting technique in real time (with cuts). I hope you like it. This is Humbrol 159 Acrylic Khaki Drab. Stirring it thoroughly with a matchstick ensures that the pigment, binder and other components of the paint are mixed correctly. *Feel free to play some chill music in the background or something* This is my homemade wet palette. There’s a link in the top right corner of the video, and in the description, to a video where I show you how you can make your own. A wet palette stops your paint from drying up and naturally thins the paint to a good consistency. I find it to be a very helpful tool. The model is Airfix’s 1/76 scale Cromwell. There’s a link in the top right corner, and in the video description, to my full build video of the kit if you’re interested. I have a bad habit of wiping paint off on my thumb if my brush is loaded with too much paint. The oils on my skin could have an effect the paint. I’d recommend that you remove excess paint on a paper towel. The brush I’m using is from the old ‘Royal and Langnickel’ softgrip range. ‘Royal and Langnickel’ and ‘Windsor and Newton’ are my favourite brands of brushes. When painting with acrylics I always use brushes with synthetic bristles. Gold Taklon synthetic bristles are my favourite. To get the best coverage and to minimise brush strokes, make sure you chose a brush size that suits the surface area you are painting. If you’re covering a large area, a 2cm ‘flat’ brush could be ideal. If you are adding fine detailing, a 00 size ‘liner’ brush could be the most suitable. The brush I’m using here is roughly a 7mm ’round’ brush because the surface area varies, but is generally quite small. The rounded tip of the brush means that, by changing the angle of the brush on the surface, I can change the thickness of the brush. If I hold the brush at 90 degrees to the surface, the tip of the brush creates a fine line. If I hold the brush at 20 degrees to the surface, the wider part of the brush comes into contact with the surface and creates a thicker line. I hope you’re enjoying this so far. Let me know your thoughts in the comment section. And if you’re listening to music – what are you listening to? Time to add more paint to the wet palette. I’d just like to take a moment to thank you for supporting me and this channel. You always send such lovely, supportive comments and messages and they really mean a lot to me. I always try and read every single one. Even if I don’t always reply – thank you. Because the surface I’m painting is quite small I’m using lots of short brush strokes to apply the paint. If I was painting a larger surface area, I’d paint with longer strokes to reduce brush marks. This is only the second coat of paint I’m applying. The model will still need a third coat once this one has dried. I tend to leave acrylic paint at least two hours to cure fully before applying another coat. I’ve pretty much completely moved from enamel paints to acrylic paints now. I will still use enamels/oils if I need to fade colours (eg. Luftwaffe mottled camouflage) I prefer the faster curing times of acrylics, that brushes can be cleaned in water and the fact that they don’t smell as strongly as enamels. The second coat on the Cromwell is now complete. I’ll leave the model somewhere safe to dry for at least 2 hours. The air-tight lid on the wet palette will lock in the moisture and keep the paint wet, ready for another painting session. To clean the brush I first swirl it quickly in clean water. Then I gently push the bristles along the side of the pot. I gently reshape the bristles into a point on my finger (though it would be better to us a paper towel). I then hang the brush on my DIY brush stand, with the bristles pointing down, to dry. This prevents water and paint residue from running into the ferrule, and helps the bristles to keep their shape. I hope you enjoyed this. Thanks for watching.

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