Painting A Bike Ourselves | Cheap Bike To Super Bike Ep. 2

Painting A Bike Ourselves | Cheap Bike To Super Bike Ep. 2


– In a previous episode, I found and collected the cheap bike, which I’m gradually going to
be turning into a super bike. And I’ve stripped it down, as you can see. And by doing so, I was able to get a good look at the frame and forks to make sure
that everything was okay. Today we are gonna give
this bike something which screams pro, and that is a paint job. That’s right. I’m gonna spray this bike up. Just you wait. I’m a little bit nervous actually. (lighthearted electronic music) Now, through much arguing
or debate in the office. Alright, let’s see if
anyone’s in here I can ask for advice on paint. Ah, Mr. Hank, here he is. Speak of the devil, right mate. I’ve got to go paint this bike. – Yeah. – [Host] Give me a bit of advice. What am I gonna paint it like? I’m a little bit lost for inspiration. – I mean, good question. I would go, for like, you know those old Spitfires
that they used to have? – [Host] Oh yeah. – With those, the pin ups on the front. Cav did it. – [Host] Yeah, you did. I’m not sure about my artistic
painting is as good as that. But– – Or, maybe, the zebra look Cipollini did. – [Host] Oh right, yeah, yeah. – [Hank] Just cover it,
make it like a zebra. – [Host] A zebra, right. A zebra bike, that’s
some food for thought. – [Host] Thanks mate. – Something a bit different. – [Host] Very different. – (laughs) – [Host] See you later. – See you boy. – [Host] Don’t work too hard. – No man, always. – [Host] I’m lost. I don’t know what to do. What would you do if
you could paint a bike? – Well, I would go for something like a mirrored chrome finish, but then, I don’t know, maybe a couple
of maps on some point of it, from some of the favorite
rides I’ve ever done. Nothing too difficult Jon. – [Jon] No, right, so you want me to mirror chrome it, and also put some maps on it somehow. – Yeah, from a couple of your favorite rides in the past. – [Jon] Brilliant, you’ve
definitely given me, a headache with that suggestion. But, yeah, thank you very much. – Enjoy. – [Jon] Get back to work, go on. I need your help mate. You know that cheap bike I’m
turning into a super bike? – Yeah. – I’ve got to paint it, and the problem is that I’ve asked Hank, I’ve asked Opie. Their suggestions, I can’t do that. I’m not a magician,
I’m not a paint expert. So I’ve come to you. Now how am I gonna paint this bike? I can’t let down the viewers. They’re ganging for it. – I don’t supposed their
designs were very good anyway, were they? Young whippersnappers. They got no class. Anyway, I think the
paint job’s pretty easy. I’ve always wanted a bike where most of it was kind of a golden, a blond fizzy color, and then the very top part of the frame is more of foamy white color. You hear that? – I was thinking something a bit easier than a beer colored bicycle. – Yeah, if you can’t do
that, I would go for, I don’t think you can go wrong
with something traditional. Nothing too complicated. A bit of red, a bit of
yellow, a bit of blue. That would stand out. – Ooooo. Yeah, now you’re talking. I’ve got an idea. I’m going let you go
back to your intervals. And I’ve got to go spray this bad boy. Because the viewers, they want to see results, don’t they? Let’s face it. – Yeah, I’m looking
forward to seeing it mate. – Yeah, so am I because I’m
gonna get absolutely covered in paint, I reckon. Well, it’s gonna be worth it. We’ve decided that this
bike should actually take the color scheme of
Greg LeMond’s 1991 race bike, bike which I think looks great, and hopefully I can replicate okay. Besides, we also need to get rid of this suddenly controversial
logo on the seat tube. At this point, I was also
tempted to take you home with me, to actually see my workshop and
the air fed spraying set up, and the shop blast cabinet, but not everyone has that luxury. So something which you
can probably all get from your local bike shop is
something called Spray.Bike, and we’re lucky enough to
supply us a few cans of this. Now the folks at Spray.Bike
did in fact tell me that I could just paint over
the existing paint work. But I think we should
actually take it back to the bare metal in order to
save a little bit of weight and also get the best job possible. So for this, I am gonna
be using one of these. A preparation wheel which is gonna attach onto an angle grinder, to try and get rid of as much paint from the frame forks as
possible before priming it. So, let’s go and do that. (gentle music) Now I’ve managed to get off
as much paint from the frame and forks as possible. It’s time to apply some of
this metal primer onto it, which means that the paint is
actually going to stick to it, just that little bit better. As you can see, I’ve also filled in any
of the threaded parts of the frame too with
little bits of tissue paper so this paint doesn’t clog it and make my job much more
difficult than the line. It only takes 20 minutes to dry, too, which means I can carry
on with the painting in a pretty short amount of time. So, with no further ado, like magic, here it goes. I’m gonna follow the
instructions down to the letter, so I’ve been told to
shake the can vigorously and do it in strokes
about 20 centimeters away from the frame. Here goes. (slow electronic music) So there we are, the prime is on. And I must say, it is quite an easy job but
it’s quite difficult too, to actually see what you have done and what you haven’t done, because of the silver of the
brushed aluminum underneath. But when I come back,
once this is dried fully, we’re gonna start painting it. And this when the nerves
are really gonna kick in. (slow jazz music) Right, so the primer is dry and now comes the most
nerve-racking bit of all for me because I’m now gonna actually
do the final coats of paint. But I have been reassured
by the folks of Spray.Bike that this paint does in fact
come out almost dry-like and in a powder form,
which is music to my ears. Because having used rattle cans before, when they start to dribble and
run down a bike or a frame, it’s absolutely, well, awful to see. So fingers crossed for me,
please, everybody at home, because you don’t understand
quite how nervous I am about this. Right, let’s do it. Also, I’ve printed out
this so at least I know what I’ve got to paint. (mid-tempo jazz music) So there we are, the finished item. I must say, though, halfway through, I decided that I didn’t
want to do the fade anymore and instead, I wanted to go
for some nice, clean cut lines. A bit like the Panasonic
team bikes of the late ’80s and early ’90s. Hope you like it. Let me know, though, what you think of the
color scheme down below. And also, why not like and share this video
with your friends too? And stay tuned, because in the next episode, I’m going to be spec’ing out exactly what this bike is going to be coming with. And why not check out the GCN Shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com? We got a whole heap of goodies for you to spend your pocket money on. And now, for another great video. In fact, part one, exactly
why we chose this bike, how about clicking just down here.

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