Paintball Gun Maintenance : Paintball Gun Maintenance: Tank

Paintball Gun Maintenance : Paintball Gun Maintenance: Tank


Hi, this is Robert Stewart, with hill13.com.
And when we start talking about maintenance, the first thing we’re going to talk about
there is the propellant. The power that makes the gun do what it does. So, it’s just as
critical in terms of getting out on the field, and enjoying the day, rather than fussing
around with your gun all afternoon because it won’t work properly. So, when we talk about
tanks, one of the first things I want to point out is this is what I always do; when I get
my tanks filled, or when I come out here to the field; out here to hill 13 to play, if
I’ve got two or three tanks to fill, I always make sure to hold onto my caps. I have a little
cube in my toolbox that is just to keep these in, so that I don’t lose them, and I always
make sure to put them back on there; filled or unfilled, especially when they’re being
transported. The reason being is that this is made of brass, which is easily dented,
and if you get any dents in the top faceplate of the valve itself, it will not properly
seat. By properly seat, that means make a flat watertight or airtight connection so
that the air is not lost between the tank, and the paintball gun. The other critical
element is the o-ring, and we’re going to get into that in a little bit, and the burst
valve, or the burst disk. We’re going to come back, and talk about o-rings in a minute here,
and talk about replacing these, but these two components; if they’re working properly,
and the tank is full of air, and you haven’t dented the front face of it, and it seats
to the weapon, you’ll get good airflow.

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