Paintball Gear Maintenance : Paintball Air Tank Maintenance

Paintball Gear Maintenance : Paintball Air Tank Maintenance


Hello this is Rob Rubin and you’re watching
Expert Village. Today we are going to talk about air tank maintenance. There is really
not a lot you need to do as an end user on your own air tank. For example you don’t have
to take the regulator apart yourself. Unless you know what you are doing, do not take this
apart. Some different regulators require some maintenance if you have moving parts on them
like such but for the most part air tanks are pretty much leave it be because unless
you know what you are doing you can really hurt yourself. There is one part of maintenance
that you can do and that requires you checking the tank visually. By law every air tank that
is made has to have a date stamp on it. The date stamp tells you when this tank was created.
Fiber tanks have to be tested every three to five years depending on the make of the
tank itself. Steel tanks must be tested every five years. If your tank is out of date, your
paintball field cannot by law fill this tank. For example, this tank was made in the year
2000, that means this tank is out of date. This tank was made in the year 2003 which
means that it is currently still in date although this is going to need to be rehydrotested
very soon. You can rehydrotest tanks. For example this is an old steel tank that I have
and as you can see there is a new stamp date on it but it is your responsibility as a player
to check the dates on it and to know if it is in or out of date because if you get to
the field and the guy looks at the air tank and it is out of date he is not going to fill
it for you no matter how much you beg and plead for him to do so. You’re not worth the
fine, trust me. When you are inspecting your tanks at home the biggest thing you can check
is the O ring on the top here. The O ring is what makes a seal between the air tank
and your paintball marker. You want to make sure that the O Ring is whole. You don’t want
it to be cracked or it is not dried out and if you need to replace it always have a whole
bunch of spares. You should have this in your kit anyway because you can never have enough
O rings. There is one thing I do want to talk about and that is on the fill nipple, this
little piece right here. Never under any certain circumstances get oil in or around this fill
nipple. Don’t even make excuses, just don’t do it. The reason is when you have got high
pressure air attached to this through whatever you are using to fill it with bad things happen
with oil and high pressure air. A lot of friction goes on in there. Very bad things so keep
the nipple protected and keep it dry. Also after playing you just want to visually inspect
your tank, make sure there are no scars or scrapes on it, no physical bad damage to the
tank. The reason is that it is a high pressure air tank, you don’t really want to have a
breech in your high pressure air tank. Then after you are done you get a thread saver
like this and put it on the top because you don’t want your threads to get damaged. If
you drop the air tank on the threads it won’t get a good seal and that’s not good and it
is just bad for the air tank. So put the thread saver on there and then put the tank away.

17 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *