Oil Painting Tips: How to Paint a Sunrise : Selecting Paints for Oil Painting Sunrise

Oil Painting Tips: How to Paint a Sunrise : Selecting Paints for Oil Painting Sunrise


In many painting projects, I cover paints,
and palettes earlier on in the process. I have intentionally left that later, because
sunrises are one of those types of projects where people bring in strong, preconceptions
of color. So, we’re going to cover that now, and we’re going to go over each color and
in depth and explain why, exactly, it has a partner sunrise. There’ll be some colors
that you may expect to be there, which will not be. But we’re going to start off with
what the colors are going to be placed on, which is our palette today. This is going
to be where we’re going to be spacing all the paints on. I’ve also a nice painter’s
box here, which is optional. We’re going to be putting all of our different paint colors
on here today. First we’re going to have some titanium white. While most of our colors are
going to be very brilliant, they’re going to be a couple areas where we’re going to
want to fade them out a bit. Fade them. Make them a little lest, less intense, and white
is a great color for that, but we will not be using a lot of it today. Next, we’re going
to have color called permanent rose. Permanent rose is one of those colors which is, it’s
almost like liquid sunrise, liquid sunset. You’re going to get lots of wonderful deep
pinks, violets or purples out of this. You just have to be careful though, because a
little of this goes a long ways. And you don’t want to be making your entire painting out
to be permanent rose. We’re also going to have some black, which again we’ll be using
sparingly, mainly down in our mountain areas to create some shadowed effects, but again,
it’s not going to be extreme, it’s going to be more mixed with other colors to form grays,
rather than intense black. I also have a pure violet color, which I’m going to use in combination
with the permanent rose. Part of that’s to make sure the permanent rose does not take
over the painting. Also part of that because some of the unique violet qualities of permanent
rose when you mix it with other things are a little more intense, and this is more of
somber violet, which I’ll be using today. I also have some cooler yellow radiant lemon
here. And with radiant lemon, we’re going to be toning down some of our warm colors,
while a sense that’s very brilliant, it’s not always warm. You could also have some
cooler ideas in there as well. Some cooler pigments which are going to help capture with
radiant lemon going to have a good standard medium yellow. This is not too warm, not too
cool, nice middle of the road yellow color, which are going to be used down towards the
golden base of our sunrise. I have a little bit of orange, not going to be using a lot
of this today. Orange is one of the most common colors people associate with brilliant sunrises
and or sunsets for that matter and in this case that we’re not going to be using much
of it. It’s going to be like a very thin border region as you’re going to see. And last but
not least, I have a yellow highlight. This is basically a cadmium light color. What this
is going to be used is perks name; we’re going to be highlighting some yellow areas. We either
want the most brilliant, the most intense, the brightest colors right where your sun
is coming up. That’s where this color is going to be.

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