Interior Decorating – Paint Colour Schemes That ALWAYS Coordinate Perfectly “Your First Four Houses”

Interior Decorating – Paint Colour Schemes That ALWAYS Coordinate Perfectly “Your First Four Houses”


Hi, my name’s Tony Law, from Your First Four
Houses, and today I’m looking forward to sharing with you a very simple way that you can find
colour schemes that coordinate and match in really, really well. It’s a simple tool that
I use, and I know that you’re going to benefit from it. Here we are. This is what I’ve been looking
forward to sharing with you. This is Adobe Colour. I’m going to put a link in the box
below that will take you straight to this page, and when you get there, what you should
do is just to set up a free account. That way you get to save off any of the colours
and themes that you’re working on. This is basically what you’re going to be
looking at. You’ve got a colour wheel with a number of arms that we can grip and move
and slide around the colour wheel. The further they are into the centre, the less intense
to your colour, and obviously, conversely, the further out, the more intense the colour
selection. You’ve got a bank of five colours. These are the main colours that we’re going
to be working with. We’ve got some RGB sliders down the bottom, and you’ve got some colour
rules, and I’m going to run you through each of these. At the moment, we’re actually looking at the
analogous colour rule. This gives us basically a main base colour and colours that are close
to it on the colour, so you end up with a rich, monochromatic kind of selection of colours,
but there are other colour rules that work really well, too. Let’s look at monochromatic.
These are colours that are all of the same colour hue, and you can see wherever we put
this, we seem to end up with colours that naturally seem to work really well together. Next we’ve got Triad. These are colours that
are evenly based around the colour wheel. Complementary are colours that are opposite
each other on the colour wheel, and you seem to find that for whatever reason, these colours
just seem to work really, really well together. Compound is very similar to Complementary,
but we’ve got a couple of analogous colours put in there as well, just to take some of
the edge off. Lastly, we’ve got Shades. These are colours of the same colour shade or hue,
naturally. By pulling these sliders around, or maybe
by adjusting the RGB sliders on the bottom here, you can see how you can really quickly
build up a selection of colours or themes that you really like, and when you find something
that you do really like … I’m going to work with Complementary just for a moment. Let’s
say I like this colour here. You can save those off. Let’s just click on Save, and we’re
going to save a copy. There we go. We’re going to give this a name. We’re going to call it
… We’re going to call it Blue and Brown, save it off, and that goes into the My Themes
area. We go to My Themes. You can see that you can
start to boot up a whole selection of colours and themes that you like, and you can work
with those moving forwards, but be under no illusion. There are hundreds if not thousands
of colours or colour themes that are already on Adobe Colour. Most of these have actually
been created by people like yourself, and they’re uploaded to the Adobe Forum, and there
are some stunning colours in here. In fact, you could just choose to work with some of
these, but I would ask the question, where is the fun in that? If I go back to Create, one of the other things
that I really love about this application is that you can click on this icon over here,
and then you can pick out any image that you like, and you can bring it into the application,
and it will instantly pick up the colours that are within this image, so at the moment
we have a colour mood of Colourful set up, though admittedly all of this image is fairly
colourful, but you can see how these little wheels have instantly slid onto the various
coloured components within the image and [inaudible 00:03:46] those colours for us. We can however
pick out Bright, Muted, Deep or Dark to boot up a different selection of colours, and just
like before, we can save those off. If I go back to Create for a moment, one of
the other things I should show you briefly is that when you do get a selection of colours
that you like, down at the bottom we’re given the RGB codes and hex codes. You’re going
to need those when you’re trying to actually tell other people about the colours that you’re
actually working with, for example you’re trying to make up paints or if you want to
select or send these colours on to other people to share them with you, to with them, rather. It’s a really fantastic little application.
I know you’re going to have a lot of fun playing around with it, but it’s got some really practical
uses when you’re trying to find colours that complement each other and work really well
with each other. I should just take a moment here just to thank Julian [Maurice 4:36],
a very good friend of mine. He’s also an extraordinary interior designer, for pointing this particular
application out to me, and I’m going to pop a little link in the box below here, if you
want to check out his website. I encourage you to do so. I really hope you found that useful. As always,
if you did, I’d really appreciate a like. Maybe you can give me a comment. Not a compliment,
a comment, please, on YouTube, that would be great. If you have liked it, if you could
share it with others, and if you haven’t already done so, please subscribe, and that way I
can make sure I let you know when the next video is up and available to you. My name
is Tony Law from Your First Four Houses. Thank you so much for watching. I look forward to
seeing you in the next video. Thank you.

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