IKEA Furniture Makeover: How to Paint IKEA Furniture, Hamptons Style!

IKEA Furniture Makeover: How to Paint IKEA Furniture, Hamptons Style!


So today I’ve decided to tackle a
cabinet that we’ve had for years and it’s kind of an Ikea Hack! Hi guys and welcome
back to another episode of Hampton Your House. I’m Belle and my channel is all
about bringing the coastal Hamptons vibe to your house. I would love for you to
stick around and subscribe to my channel, which by the way is completely free, and
that way you won’t miss out on anything new. So we’ve got this little ‘ode to Ikea’
in the corner of our family room – an Ikea Billy Bookcase, the CD towers and the
Oxberg glass panel doors. I’ve decided to update it in a Hampton style using some
white paint, new door handles and replacing the back of the Billy bookcase
section. These glass panel doors weren’t originally designed to go over the CD
towers, but we hacked them on ourselves because at the time one of our kids was
constantly pulling all the CDs and DVDs out onto the floor, so those doors helped
to stop that problem. Well, we’ve got a lot of work to do so
let’s get straight into it! First I’m just going to declutter the stuff we
have in here. There are a few cookbooks that I no longer use and a few CDs and
DVDs that could probably go. I know many people don’t even use these anymore but
hey I’m a bit old school and I like having them. I think it’s good for the
kids to use them too. Because these particular IKEA cabinets are wood veneer
I can sand them and then paint them. If you’re trying to paint laminate,
make sure you paint on a primer or undercoat first or the paint won’t stick.
I used a little bit of spray on primer in a few places, mostly in the corner of
the cabinets where it was hard to sand properly and it seemed to help. Try to
keep all of your hardware in a ziplock bag so it doesn’t get lost. Now here’s
the part where we stand everything really well! I did this by hand but in
hindsight I would recommend using a random orbital sander so you know that
it’s been done thoroughly and so you can do it more quickly. Either way make sure
you have a dust mask and safety glasses on, or sunnies or your normal glasses are
fine too just to protect you from all that fine dust. After you’ve sanded each piece, make sure
you wipe all of the fine dust off really well with a damp cloth. When it comes to
the painting, you will need a small roller, preferably with a spare head, a
paint tray, a paint stirring stick, a paintbrush and something to open your
tin with. The paint I’m using today is the Dulux low gloss aquanamel in the
colour Vivid White. Now we start painting. My tip? Do the boring bits first – that way
you can practice your painting skills on things that won’t be as visible and when
you get to the important bits you will be a pro. Also it will help to keep you
motivated to see the whole thing as a finished product. When you’re painting
the shelves lay them on a plastic party tablecloth or tarp that you don’t need.
If you put them on newspaper you’ll end up with little bits of newspaper stuck
to the backs of your shelves. First paint all of the edges and the underneath side
of the shelves. You’ll need to do at least two coats on the top, bottom and
the front edge of the shelves. I just gave the chipboard edges one quick coat
because they won’t be visible anyway. Also make sure you sand everything
lightly with a fine grit sandpaper in between coats of paint. You want a
medium to coarse grit sandpaper for sanding the surfaces before you start
your painting. A great painting tip is to cover your
paint tray with a plastic bag because when you’ve finished painting, you don’t have
to spend hours trying to scrub every last bit of paint off the tray so that
it won’t flake off into your paint the next time you use it. Remember to cut in
around the edges with the paintbrush first. If you like the look of painting
with the paintbrush better I recommend doing your first one or two coats with
the roller and then do the final coat with a paintbrush to give it that
slightly streaky woodgrain look – just make sure you only paint in the
direction of the grain with the paintbrush. A few coats later it’s starting to look
nice and bright and white. Next step – taking the back out of the
Billy Bookcase. It had started breaking off at the bottom, so I decided to
replace it with some tongue and groove board, which gives the v-j paneling look.
I bought one six meter long tongue and groove board and they cut it to size for
me in the shop. If you need them to be narrower and your hardware store can’t
cut it length ways for you, ask at your local school tech room if they would be
willing to help you out. Grab some wood glue, put some in the joint of one board,
slot the next one into place and make sure all the ends line up perfectly. When
you’re painting this stuff make sure you cut in with a paintbrush before you do
the rest with a paint roller. You’ll also want to get the white paint down into
knot holes in the wood because if you don’t it kind of looks like a black hole. Time to attach the boards to the back of
the bookcase. You’re going to put some glue on and then nail it on afterwards
as well but before you glue or slot your boards into place I highly recommend
marking on the sides for thickness and positioning of the middle shelf so that
when you come to hammering everything into place later, you know exactly where
to put the nails along the middle. This will save you from having to measure it
in a weird way like I did because unfortunately I put the glue down before
I had done this! Here I am measuring the position of the
middle shelf afterwards – oops! and no nails came thrrough – success! With the
doors after you’ve given them a really good sand you’ll want to grab some blue
painters tape and tape off your glass right on the edge where the wood meets
the glass. The tricky thing with these doors is
that on one side at least, there’s kind of a lip that overlaps the glass. If you
can’t get your tape to go in exactly the right spot, you can grab an extra bit of
tape and add it on afterwards to get it in closer. Where you can, try to take your
hardware off before painting and then put it all back on when it’s all dry. And three coats of paint later it’s so
much fun taking the tape off to see that nice neat painted edge underneath. Now here’s a couple of tips for when
you’re putting those tiny shelves back in. First use a CD or DVD to double check
the spaces between your shelves to save you having to move them later, and second,
if you find that some paint has collected in the holes where you need to put those
little pegs, just grab a screwdriver and spin it a couple of times in the hole.
This should clear the paint out. For the cupboard doors, I got these awesome door
knobs from Bunnings which I will link for you in the description box below. The
knob has a little burr on the underneath side so when you screw it on just make
sure that the knobs stay still and doesn’t spin around or you will end up
with a little circle drawn in your new paint. They also have the snap off screws
so you just need to measure the length that you need and then snap it off at
the length you want with some pliers. After attaching the doors it’s time to
put everything back in again. And we are done! Here’s the before, and
after! So I hope this project has inspired you
to go and tackle an old piece of furniture that you have and give it a
whole new look. I’m so happy with the way that mine has turned out.
Don’t forget to subscribe to Hampton Your House, thank you so much for
stopping by, give this video a thumbs up if you enjoyed it, and I’ll see you in my
next video! Bye!

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