How to use white ink

How to use white ink


Welcome to Draw Tip Tuesday! Here’s your weekly dose of inspiration to
build a creative habit one drawing at a time
brought to you by Sketchbook Skool Today we’re using a white gel pen by Pentel
And a black rollerball pen. because lack and white work awesome on a toned
background. I’m using grey toned paper from Strathmore,
but you could also use a piece of cardboard, or coloured paper. It doesn’t really matter what subject you
choose. Look around you. Anything is interesting when you draw it. When I look around in my studio, I see these
mini cacti and i really like their different shapes and sizes so I’ll draw these. I’ll start with the tall one on the left
and then work from left to right. First, I’ll draw its outline. Then I notice that it’s overlapped by the
stubby cactus so I’ll draw the outline of this one too, checking reference points and
also noticing the space between the shapes, the negative space. I draw the outline of the other plants as
well. And as I go along, I really notice their interesting
shapes and am not paying attention to any detail yet. Now that the overall shapes are all on the
page, I start filling them in with the prickly details. Also, I add shading with hatching lines as
I go along. The longer you look at your subject, the more
details you will see the you can add. I am not too accurate on every detail. As long as I capture the essence of each of
the plants, their characteristics, I’m very happy. With the shading, you can add depth to your
drawing. Each plant has its own pattern of prickles
and dots – it’s very interesting to see how the prickles neatly spiral around the
plant, or are in a perfectly straight row. And for this last plant, I don’t even have
a lot of detail to add. Just shading will make the distinction between
leaves and stem. Time for the white gel pen! I will use it to emphasise on the lighter
bits that I see on the plants, as well as the highlights. Some objects are very shiny and will have
loads of sharp highlights – the ones here are a bit silky, but they’re there alright! And by exaggerating the highlights of the
subject in the foreground, you can make the subject come forward a bit more. You may notice more shadows as you go along
too, that you missed at first. It’s great to see how the white pops off
the page and brings the drawing to life, don’t you think? Try doing a drawing with black and white – find
yourself a cardboard box and cut one of its sides off to draw on. Have fun and make those highlights pop! And if you want to learn more, you can sign
up for a free kourse at sketchbookskool.com. See you in klass!

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