How to use the Expressive Brush Pack for ParticleShop and Painter

How to use the Expressive Brush Pack for ParticleShop and Painter


before we get started with particle shop I want to talk a little bit about the menu structure the actual brush display in particle shop is going to be truncated and so I want to show you what the full list looks like which you’ll probably see with no problem on your larger display secondly I want to talk about the names you can see what happens in particle shop is these names are going to get truncated you’re not going to see the full name over here I’m showing you what those full names are secondly I want to show you that this blue coloration indicates that these are brushes that blend color they don’t apply color the one exception is smear paint and you can see over here in the actual list that it shows a little color that’s because it does start off with color but then it tapers off to just picking up color and the brushes that are displayed as black actually apply color and the other thing I want to show you here is I’m going to turn this little overlay on you’ll see that some of these brushes have the same starting name in this case we’ve got Harry blend and Harry stroke anytime a brush starts with the first name and isolated them by color boxes here that means those brushes are the same brush but they will behave somewhat differently so you can see the Harry blend is a brush that’s not going to apply color but it’s going to use the same brush qualities as you’re going to get in the Harry stroke brush which does apply color so particularly in the case of this sketch brush you’ve got three different versions of it that you can use two of them will apply color and one is going to only blend color there is some information available just in the way these are colored with in the actual particle shop display when we open it up but as I said you’ll see some of these names you can’t read all of them and that’s just a condition of the way particle shop works let’s go ahead now and take a look at particle shop I’ve got it installed as a panel here Photoshop CC I’m going to duplicate the active layer which right now is simply the background so let’s go ahead launch particle shop here we are and I’ve got my color palette I like to keep it pinned right here over this area of the other packs and that way I can concentrate on my painting and keep my color palette right close at hand as I mentioned earlier you can see how this is truncated because I’m working on a lower resolution screen I can’t open this up all the way to see all of the brushes at once so I do have to navigate through here the other thing is you can see many of these brushes the name is too long to see the whole name so you’ll have to get by memorizing or getting used to where these are within this layout let’s go ahead and try a few of these out I’m going to start with the dripper brush and as you can see this just applies random splatters of paint much in the spirit of Jackson Pollock a 50s abstract expressionist painter gouache is another one and I’m not going to try to do anything right now I’m just going to show you these you can see one thing about watches each stroke the color is slightly changing that is true a few of these brushes the hairy stroke is just what it says it’s a hairy stroke and we’ve also got horse tail I’m just going to keep changing colors here so we can see the different brushes you can see how this has that kind of horse tail appearance it starts large and then fans out a bit this one also you can see just slightly changes color for each stroke to give you a little variability old clumpy is similar to hairy stroke with the hairs of the brush are much larger so you get a little bit more of a gnarly kind of look to it gets quick is one that I’ll use a little bit more later one reason I like this is it almost looks like when you’re drawing on a paper napkin you you draw very loosely and sometimes several lines overlap when you’re just simply trying to get an idea out on paper also this get twist similar but it does in a very fine version so you get that same multiplicity of stroke we’ve also got wet bristle and this one starts off with the color that is current but you can see how it tapers off and becomes more of a blender with the colors that it finds underneath of it smear paint is another brush that has a somewhat coarse tale-like feel but again they’re all different and just depending on what kind of stroke you want you’ll find each one of these gives you a very different kind of feel okay now let’s take a look at the blenders we’ll start here the Harry blender acts just like the Harry stroke except it’s not going to lay down paint same kind of constitution of the brush hairs but we’re not applying paint at this point so this becomes a good tool for blending same with the horse blend it’s like the horse tail brush itself but once again it does not pick up color and none of these will puller has a rather granular kind of look to the way that it picks up underlying color wispy blend is another very fine type brush that is good for detail and finally we get to mirror blend which I really like this one has a very complex look as to the way it mixes up the paint that it finds underneath of it okay let’s go ahead and we’ll save this and I’m going to save only the brushstrokes and I’ll say okay and now we’ve got our original and we’ve got our version that has the brushstrokes atop it I’m going to do a little sketch on top of this background so I’m going to go ahead and launch particle shot again I’m going to select my sketch quick brush here and let’s just do a little bit of drawing here and you can see how I just want to get a very spontaneous look with this switch to the get with the brush here just to put a little bit of color and I’ll put a little bit of fear into this the expression brushes give you a way to create some paint strokes within Photoshop that you can’t do with the Photoshop brushes so it’s a great extra bit of kit to have along with Photoshop you’ve got basically painter inside Photoshop

2 Comments

  • Melvin Antonio Guerrero Morán says:

    I am trying the plugin but it run pretty slow on my pc 🙁

    I have a HP Workstation Z600 / 2 Xeon x5550 2. / 24gb ram / 2GB nVidia DRR5 /SSD 1TB / Windows 10 with the last Adobe Photoshop CC 2017…. Is there any way to my it work faster?

  • FreeSpokenOne says:

    I've purchased several of the brush packs and what I find most frustrating is that before buying them we can't see how they are best used in Painter 2017 in my case. I don't use nor have I ever had ParticalShop, but it looks like it could use some work on the user interface.

    Painter has, on the other hand, made major improvements since I started using it with version IX, but I digress. After buying brush packs it's occurred to me that it would be far more useful if I could choose brushes from different packs to build my own 15 brush packs as each pack has a few I like and others which turn out useless for my needs. It's reminiscent of days when we bought music in LPs and didn't have a choice of which songs we liked and wanted in our music collections.

    A good example would be the dripper brush. I have the Splatter Brush Pack already and don't need yet another dripper! What I could use is a brush pack with a combination of uses. Most importantly, when I purchase a brush pack, it would be good to know which brush category I'm buying into. I might not want or need particle brushes for instance and am looking for oils or watercolors and oil pastel brushes rather than grunge or brushes more suited to graphic designers. I know some packs are specific, but not all include this information, and as more packs are made available I notice this more often being the case.

    I hope Corel will take my constructive comments into consideration, think about what I'm saying and why. I'm an artist with specific painterly needs over those of trendy, popular, or design brushes. They are beautiful in their own way and have their place, but consider adding more useful information about these brushes beyond selling them. It's helpful to see them put into use by other artists who demonstrate them prior to purchase so we know what we are buying and why.

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