How To Use The Brush Tool In Snapseed From Google

How To Use The Brush Tool In Snapseed From Google


It’s time for a tutorial on the Brush Tool
here in Snapseed from Google. For this demo, I have created this grey texture
that you see on the screen right now. I know that this is not the kind of exciting
image that I usually use for these videos but trust me. This canvas is the perfect backdrop for understanding
how the brush tool functions in this app. So let’s say that I want to make one select
part of this canvas darker. Well, this seems like a perfect task
for the Brush Tool. When the Brush tool launches you will see
two toolbars down there at the bottom of the screen. On the upper bar, the black bar, which we
can show or hide by tapping on the word Effect we get to pick the type of brush that we want
to use. Along the lower bar, the bar in white, we
get to select the strength of the brush and turn on the show or hide mask option. If you want to see the size of the brush that
you are about to use then press two fingers against the screen. That little circle that appears represents
the size of your brush tip. Now the Snapseed engineers did something clever
here. As you zoom out using the pinch in move
with two fingers your brush grows larger and larger. As you zoom in the brush grows smaller and
smaller. If you zoom in enough then the navigator window
will appear like we have seen in other tutorials. I am going to double tap in the navigator
to return to our standard fit on screen view. Again tapping on the word Effect will show
us the four types of brushes that we can use in here. Painting with the Saturation brush allows
us to add or subtract saturation, which is the strength of color. I am not going to demo this one right now because
there are so few colors in this gray canvas but I will show you what happens if you paint
with the Temperature brush. -10 here tells Snapseed to add blue to the
areas that I cover with the brush. Likewise, +10 tells Snapseed to add yellow. Painting with the Temperature brush adds a
wash of color to the areas that we paint over. Let me reset things in here by Cancelling out
of this tool with the X in the right corner and then relaunching the Brush tool. Now those two are fairly self-explanatory
but that is not true for the dodge & burn vs. exposure brushes. On the one hand, both of these brushes do the
same thing. Both the dodge & burn brush and the exposure
brush can be used to make part of your image brighter or darker. But if we dig a little a deeper I think you
will soon discover that the Exposure brush is the better option. Let me show you why. I am going to select the brush that I don’t
like which is the Dodge & Burn brush. Then I am going to tap on the Decrease
arrow here on the toolbar to choose a brush that will make things darker as I paint over
the canvas. I am going to start with the -5 choice and
now I am going to paint a number 5 out here on the screen. I have to go back and forth a couple of times
which I really appreciate. Each swipe is cumulative until eventually,
I have reached the limit of what a -5 change can do for us. Next, I am going to tap on the Decrease button
again to bring up the -10 brush which is even stronger. Now I will paint a 10. As you can see, the change that I can eventually
create at -10 is much darker than the change that I can create at -5. This is all fine until I change my mind. If I wanted to go back now and make the area
that I just painted over with that -10 brush into a lighter gray then you would think that
choosing the -5 brush and painting back over that area would make this area match the
density of the 5 over there on the left. But no dice. With the Dodge and Burn brush, it’s a one-way
street. With this type of brush, once it’s burned
or dodged down this far then it’s done. The only choice I have right now, other
than to cancel out this tool and start all over, is to switch to the Eraser brush
and then to erase away the whole area that I had already painted. I could certainly repaint that area again
but this gets really tedious if all I wanted to do is to modify the changes that
I have already made without starting all over. So let me show you a better way. I am going to tap on Effect again
and switch over to the Exposure brush. The first thing that I hope that you will
notice when I tap on the decrease arrow this time is that the units have changed. With the Exposure brush, we actually get three
levels of gradation. A negative .3 or positive, a .7,
and full 1 stop level of change. Right there we already have a small advantage
compared to the Dodge & Burn brush where we only had two levels of possible change but
let’s get to the real advantage here. I am going to start with this -1 brush,
the strongest brush I can have. Now I will paint a -1,
just like I did last time. Like last time, let’s say that now I change
my mind, and I don’t want this change to be quite so strong. Well, fortunately, I can tap on the
Increase and choose either -.7 or -.3 As you can see now I can paint things back
to a lighter shade of gray. I am still making things darker than they
used to be but now it’s not an all or nothing tool. I find this much more forgiving and far easier
to use on a real photo than the Dodge & Burn brush. On that note, let me commit these changes
and then I will bring up a real image so that you can see where this tool might be useful. Here is an image that I shot a few months
ago as winter was ending here in Montana. Now, I have already tuned this image up here in
Snapseed and I am happy with the way that it looks overall. At this point, I want to darken down the sky
and lighten up the foreground. As you have already seen the Exposure brush
in here is my favorite choice. I will tap on the Decrease arrow to set the
Exposure to -.7. Now I am going to use the Two-Finger Pinch
to make my image really small. I am going to use the edge of this big brush
to darken down the top of the sky. By Painting above the actual image I am able
to create a nice smooth transition as I swipe along across the sky. I am going tap once to lighten up the brush
exposure to that -.3 setting and then I will paint over the sky
that is closer to the horizon. Two more taps will give me a brush with a
positive exposure setting. Now I am going to use the two-finger push
move to zoom back in to at least the fit on screen view. I’ll do some painting here in the middle
to lighten up the foreground. A tap on the Mask button will show where I
have and have not painted. The areas in red right now are the areas
that I have changed. The stronger the red overlay, which we call
the edit mask, or Rubylith, the stronger the change. Using this show Mask feature makes it easy
for me to see the spots that I have missed in the foreground. A little more painting to clean things up and now I can tap
to turn the mask overlay off again. Let me press on the before and after button
to show you what I have accomplished with this tool. Not bad. I like the way that the darker sky drives
my eyes down to those bright clouds along the horizon line and to the reflection in the
puddle. I am going to tap on the checkmark at this
point to commit this change and return to Snapseed’s home screen. I should Save my work right now
but the truth is that there is a far more elegant way to make the kind of changes
that we have made in this tutorial using a brush and that mask overlay feature. That more elegant method and all the things
that you can do in Snapseed with the mask however are the subject for our next series of tutorials. See you there.

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