How to Paint Shiny Ultramarine Armour – Part I

How to Paint Shiny Ultramarine Armour – Part I


What’s up guys! Welcome back, sorry there was a bit of a delay
since the last video, I’ve been busy painting Angron for a client. So far I’ve finished
off the base, it shouldn’t be long until I have the whole thing complete. This video is going to show how to paint the blue Ultramarine hanging off the side here. You can see I’ve already based him using Scale
Color Navy Blue, now if you don’t have that, GW Kantor Blue or Vallejo Steel Blue are both
pretty close equivalents. Now, because the model is falling over, I
wanted to create quite a dramatic shadow, to do that I simply painted the front of the
armour a darker blue. I used Scale Colour Deep Blue for this. If you opted to use an equivalent colour,
just add a drop of black to your base colour and you’ll get the same effect. So just continue to block in the shadow along
the front of the model, I’m doing the legs On the shoulder pads we’ll just hit this area
here towards the front. Don’t bother trying to blend any of this,
we’ll get to that later. For the first highlight we’re going to make
a pretty big jump up to Mediterranean Blue, Teclis Blue makes for a really good substitute. Now, remember the model is falling forwards
so the highlights are all going to be on his back. We’re going to block these in so that
they match the shape of the surface. So for example, the highlight on the shoulder pad
is going to be quite rounded, whereas on the armour plates here, it’s going to be a straight
line. Along the length of the surface. I want my light source to be coming from a
bit of an angle, so it’s going to hit the legs slightly off centre, it’s important when
you’re trying to get a shiney finish that you use a consistent light source. So you can use any light direction that you want just try and be mindful of it when you’re painting the model so that you get the highlights in the correct place. So again notice we’re not trying to blend any
of these highlights, just block in where they would be Now that we’ve mapped out where are lights
and darks will go on the model, we’ll start to blend them out, to do this we’ll start
off by making a roughly 1 to 1 mix of our base and highlight colours. Then we’re going to use this to paint next
to our highlights, so that it overlaps the transition slightly on either side. To clarify,
we want to have the paint cover a small amount of both the highlight and the base colour. This creates a mid tone between our base and
highlight. The reason we let it overlap onto the highlight
is to take advantage of the transparent nature of acrylics. Because some of the highlight
will show through underneath our mid tone, that’s going to help us get a much smoother
blend. To continue we’ll make a glaze with our shadow
colour, I just use water for this. You can use a glaze medium if you like but
I prefer to keep things simple. So now simply going to draw the brush over
the transition between the base and shadow, making sure to move towards the darker colour. We’ll build this up over a few layers until
the hard line between the two colour softens into nothing, leaving us with a smooth blend
between the two different shades. When I’m working with glazes I usually keep
a hairdryer in my lap, and zap the model between passes. If you don’t use a hairdryer, I can
recommend trying it, it speeds things up quite a bit. So once we’ve blended out the shadows, we’ll
move onto our midtone. Again we’ll make a glaze by adding some water and then with a
small amount on our brush we’ll draw the glaze over the transition between our base and midtone
in the direction of our highlight. Next we’ll make another glaze, this time with
our highlight colour. And we’ll glaze over the transition between our midtone and highlight. A little technique you can use here is to
stipple over the transition, so here I’m just doing lots of little dots, by simply bouncing
the tip of the brush around the line between the two colours. This helps to break up the
area and softens out the blend quite quickly. I often go back and forth between stippling
and normal glazing. Combing the two techniques speeds up the process and tends to end up
giving you a better overall finish. We’ll add another highlight in the same manner,
this time using Sky Blue, which is very similar to GW Lothern Blue. So just place the highlights as you did before
but make them a little smaller this time. You can do this before you do any blending
if you want, I quite like to break up the process a little so I don’t get bored. But
each to their own. Now we’ll just make a glaze with that same
colour and blend out the edges in exactly the same manner. In order to get the armour to shine we’ll
add some exteme reflex highlights. To do this, we’ll mix a decent amount of white
into our sky blue. And then paint a thin line down the centre
of our brightest highlight. This needs to be as straight as possible,
a wobby line is going to ruin the effect. I find it easiest to do it in one stroke.
If you mess about and try to break it up into lots of little ones you’re going to run into
a lot of issues. Just steady your hand, place the tip at the top edge and draw it backwards
across the surface in one smooth action. This is more about confidence than skill, if you
doubt yourself your hand will start to shake or you’ll stop half way and you don’t want
that. If you’re worried, try it out on a piece of paper or your thumb nail first, and just
practice until you can get a decent sharp line. For the shoulder pads, just paint a little
dot in the middle of your highlight. We’ll also add little edge highlights along
the side of the armour plates near where are reflex highlights are. In part two we’ll be looking at adding final
sparkles to the armour, we’ll also be going over how to do the gold trim, the other metal
parts, and the backpack. Thanks for watching guys, a like and share
would be most appreciated. Thanks again. Bye for now….

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