How to Paint Colorful Trees with Acrylics || Ikea Paint Brushes and Paints

How to Paint Colorful Trees with Acrylics || Ikea Paint Brushes and Paints


Hi everyone! Today we’re painting trees in children’s book
illustration style and we’re using kids paints and brushes from Ikea. I got the idea for the trees from a Maze Detective
children’s book. And I tested out my nieces’ and nephew’s paints
for this and I liked them so I got my own set of Måla paints abd brushes from Ikea. I did a little test and painted three trees
on cardboard without priming the cardboard first and it turned out fine. The cardboard is a little warped, but I thought
the coverage was good. If you paint them on thick, the priming might
not be necessary. However, you’ll see the difference between
painting on unprimed and primed cardboard later in this video. The Ikea acrylic paints cost 9 euros, it’s
a set of 8 colors, 50 ml each. Two blues, two reds, black, white, yellow
and green. It also comes with a plastic palette made
of polypropene. And the brush set has 6 brushes in different
sizes, 3 flat ones and 3 round ones, and it cost 4 euros. It also has a chart on how to mix different
colors, but it only has the most basic things like blue and yellow make green or red and
blue make purple. It doesn’t take into account that the set
has different hues of blue and red. I wanted to paint trees with different color
combinations with no background. After the test painting, I painted the actual
thing on cardboard, too. But I primed it with gesso first. The large flat brush of the set is good for
priming. I painted an X on the back of the cardboard
to hopefully keep the cardboard flat. After that dried, I painted two coats of gesso
on the other side, one horizontal and one vertical. I used only the Ikea paints and brushes for
this painting after the priming. I like the brushes, because they’re soft like
watercolor brushes. Most of my acrylic or oil painting brushes
are hard, but I actually prefer soft ones for acrylic paintings. The paints flow well even without adding water. Except for the black one, that’s thicker and
you need to add water for that. I used the medium sized round brush for the
leaves and then later the small round brush for the tree trunk and outline. I started by painting the leaves. The shape of the foliage and then adding different
colors on top to make it look more interesting. Make sure to use colors that go together. For example, the lighter blue and the green
make a nice turquoise and the darker blue and fuchsia or colder red make a nice purple. You can also dab specks of color on the tree. Some of it will mix with the colors underneath
and some won’t. It makes the colors look more lively. I let the leaves dry a bit and then painted
the tree trunks and branches. I want to scan and cut out the trees afterwards
and arrange them into a pattern so I’m not painting any ground or roots for the trees. I added a black outline for the foliage. After the trunks were dry, I painted the leaves
that are in front of the branches. I dabbed paint on them so that some of the
lines still show through. I added some white at the end for highlights
and contrast. The paints stay wet for quite long so you
can keep blending them and you need to wait for them to dry to add details on top so that
they don’t accidentally blend in too. But if you want to continue painting the next
day and you have leftover paint on the palette, I suggest wrapping it in plastic and putting
it in the fridge. That way the paint will stay wet ’till the
next day. But remember to wash the brushes after use
with soap and water. I want to talk about these Måla paints from
Ikea. It says somewhere in the package that they
are acrylics. However, I noticed you can actually reactivate
them after they’ve dried. I used them on a different painting and I
accidentally lifted paint that had already dried with a wet piece of paper. So, I’m wondering could these be gouache paints
after all? I don’t use gouache paints myself so I don’t
know, but these paints behave differently than my other acrylics. And by the way, if you let the paints dry
on the palette, you can just pour water in the wells, let it sit for a while and then
you can peel the paint off. I made a couple of trees with fall colors. Yellow base and then dabbing the warmer red
paint on it to make orange and leaving some of the red unmixed. I also tried different shapes of trees. Oval shape, round shape, more wavy ones. Branches curving up or curving down. Straight trunk or a crooked trunk. After the painting was dry, I left it under
a pile of heavy books to make it more flat. Now you can see the difference between the
first tries on unprimed cardboard and the final one on primed cardboard. I think there’s a clear difference in brightness
and contrast. Although some of it might be because of the
contrast between a white background and the colorful trees versus grey carboard and the
trees. To turn these trees into a pattern, I scanned
them in 600 dpi resolution. Then edited them in GIMP to increase contrast
and brightness and sharpness and then cut out each tree and arranged them into a repeating
pattern. I have more videos on how to do that. But this tree pattern is now available in
my Redbubble shop on different products like wall art, clocks, stickers, notebooks, mugs
and pillows. I’ll link it somewhere on the video or in
the description so you check them out. Thanks for watching!

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