How to Mix Color: Oil Painting: Warm or Cool Colors, Split Primary Palette

How to Mix Color: Oil Painting: Warm or Cool Colors, Split Primary Palette


This is Kevin McCain with Kevin McCain Studios we’re going to continue our conversation on
color and what we’re going to talk about something that I found somewhat confusing when I was in college and that is warm and cool colors now I
want to let you know that there’s there’s kinda there is your broad warm
and cool colors and your more detailed description of warm and cool and that’s where I got kind of confused so if you can keep in your mind that you have your
basic warm and cool… your basic warm and cool relationships
and you have the more detailed warm core relationships it can make it a
little easier for you so with your primary colors you’ll hear the that reds are warm, blues are cold, and some people say
yellows are warm as well but I like that they’re neutral and many other
people described as neutral they can go either way and that’s their primary colors red,
yellow, and blue. With your secondary colors green, orange, or purple your oranges are warm your violets or purples are cool again your greens can go either way
there they could be neutral well we call
the neutral that they can lean either to warm or cool. So that your basic description a warm
and cool colors. Now every color itself you will hear
people describe them as having a warm and cool side and this is just what they’re talking about when they say that. If they’re saying hey layout a warm
and cool yellow they’re talking about yellows that lean
more more cool or more green like your lemon
yellows your Cadmium Yellow lights those
colors your Hansa yellow lights those
yellows are more green so they’re cool yellow your yellows that are your Cadmium, your Cadmium Yellow deeps, Cadmium Yellow mediums on Hansa yellow deeps they more orange that is your warm yellow your red your cadmium red lights reds that lean more
orange are your warm reds your red that lean
more violet are your cool reds. Again we drop down
the blues ultramarine blue is a blue that had that
leans towards the violet families so it is my
cool blue and my blue Phthalo blue is a blue
that leans more green and it is more towards the yellows it is
my warm blue. And when I go down to my secondary
colors for my violets my warm violets would be violets that are more red my cool violets would be violets there are
that are more blue. My oranges that lean more red, pardon me, that lean more red are my warm oranges and my oranges that lean more yellow are my cool oranges. With greens my green that lean more blue are my cool greens and green that lean more yellow are my warm greens. So when people are talking about warm and cool… warm and cool blues, warm and cool reds, yellows, oranges, violets, greens that’s what
they’re referring to and these can help as you paint to identify and be able to mix warm and
cool colors. Also remember the warm and cool is context as well you know if I had all my blues and my
violets and my greens like I’m going to use this green and these blues and these two violets what would see more warm is the red violet because in context against all those other stuff its gonna seem fairly warm. Where as if I had a painting that’s mostly you know yellows
and reds like over here in this family and I would have my colors it would seem the most
cool would be my violet red. It’s a red you would think wait it should be warm but no it’s going to seem cool in context to some these others. So and same thing with this with this
yellow these are going to seem like my colors that are… there gonna be me very warm in context. And then as you begin the mix depending on variations of intensity and different thing you can create much more sophisticated relationships with warm and cool. This has been Kevin McCain with Kevin
McCain studios you can find out more about my painting
workshops, my artwork, and get art tips at kevinmccainstudios.com. Thank you, have a great day.

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