How to Hand Paint T-Shirts : How to Paint Letters on a T-Shirt

How to Hand Paint T-Shirts : How to Paint Letters on a T-Shirt


GRACE FRAGA: And while I was washing my hand
off, Chantelle was drying the two hands here. CHANTELLE TIBBS: Yeah. GRACE FRAGA: So, we’re
finished in–how long did it take you to dry them? CHANTELLE TIBBS: It took about 5 to
7 minutes especially with the more paint, you’re going to want to apply even more drying
time. Just to make sure. GRACE FRAGA: Yeah. CHANTELLE TIBBS: You’ll be surprised like
the top layer is like dry but underneath it, it’s still wet so. GRACE FRAGA: Oh, wow. Okay,
great. So, now, we’re ready to hand paint my name ’cause this is going to be my T-shirt.
CHANTELLE TIBBS: Yeah. So, we’re going to hand paint Grace’s name. Do you want to write
it out or do you want me to– GRACE FRAGA: I could–no, I’d write it out. CHANTELLE TIBBS:
Okay, cool. GRACE FRAGA: Yeah. CHANTELLE TIBBS: It’s a little bit different than–they do
have hand fabric pens, fabric paint pens. This is a little bit different. It’s a little
harder than you think. But yeah, we’re going to start out with this… GRACE FRAGA: All
right. CHANTELLE TIBBS: …so you could go ahead and use the paint on that sponge if
you like. I love really like using every ounce of paint that I possibly can. So, if there’s
extra paint in the bottom of the, you know, you want to use as much as you can ’cause
it can run expensive sometimes. GRACE FRAGA: So this is hard to do, so instead of Grace,
I’d probably spell my name John, right? CHANTELLE TIBBS: Yeah. GRACE FRAGA: That’s probably
what’s going to happen. So, I start here– CHANTELLE TIBBS: You’re going to want to hold
down wherever you want. GRACE FRAGA: Hold down, okay. So, you hold the other side. Let’s
see, so– CHANTELLE TIBBS: Make sure you’re painting in a straight line. I can paint with
a straight line without having a ruler or anything down. GRACE FRAGA: Oh. CHANTELLE
TIBBS: Some people can’t so you want to also make sure that you’re placing your letters
in the right place. Some people really do have to measure out whatever letter it will
be. Some people don’t. I don’t. But you want to make sure that everything is placed and
don’t be afraid to–I know it’s not the most creative part but I know when you have a ruler
and stuff like that, you’re measuring certain things like you go, “Oh, it was boring.” It’s
worth it just to have everything working as good as it possibly can. So assess your strong
points, assess your weaknesses and find a way to compensate for everything all together.
GRACE FRAGA: Very cool. So, I’m not doing that bad, huh? CHANTELLE TIBBS: No, it looks
perfect. GRACE FRAGA: Nice. CHANTELLE TIBBS: She’s doing really well. GRACE FRAGA: So more
or less, like you figure where the line is and you go forth. Next, you have–you kind
of even out the paint as you go along–not just like one brush stroke. You just kind
of like go– CHANTELLE TIBBS: Yeah, you keep even it out or you can even just do one really
thin layer and then keep going over it. The more you go over it, the more it’s going to
do well. With certain paint brands, though you want to be careful because if you’re painting
way, way, way too much it might crack. Tulip doesn’t seem to have that problem. GRACE FRAGA:
Oh, really? CHANTELLE TIBBS: When it dries, like, you’ll start to see some cracking, and
when it fades it starts to crack ’cause there’s just too much paint. So– GRACE FRAGA: So
what brands of paint do you recommend to avoid that? CHANTELLE TIBBS: I really love Tulip.
I think they do a really good job. For burgundies, it’s so soft. It’s really good. For black,
Speedball is really good. Their white is also really good, but it’s one of those that if
you layer it too much, it’ll crack but I don’t–actually Tulip’s white I don’t use. Speedball’s white
is fantastic. I mean it’s really bright.

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