How Is Metal Roofing Coil Painted? Metal Coaters Paint Line Tour

How Is Metal Roofing Coil Painted? Metal Coaters Paint Line Tour


(upbeat jazzy music) – What’s up, guys? Welcome to the Metal Roofing Channel. We’re here in beautiful
southern California. We’re about 40 miles east of Los Angeles, in Rancho Cucamonga. We’re gonna learn how
metal coil is painted. Metal Coaters has been
great, and they’ve agreed to let us come in and shoot some video, so let’s go inside and check it out. (upbeat electronic music) Inside, I met plant manager, Luis Pasillas and asked him to tell me more about this Metal Coaters facility. – This facility’s been
here since the late ’60s. So, we receive incoming coil
from all over the world. We coat galvanized, Galvalume,
stainless, aluminum, various different colors,
hundreds of colors. – Well, I’m really excited
to go see the process. So, why don’t we take a
walk and go check it out? – Excellent. Let’s go. – [Host] After a safety briefing and getting outfitted in PPE, the team and I met up with
maintenance engineer manager, Yusuf Shabir, to get acquainted with the coil coating process. – Hi, my name is Yusuf Shabir and I’m the maintenance
engineering manager at Metal Coaters of California. I’m gonna walk you guys
through the entire process of how a color coating operation works. At the beginning, we get raw material, which is customer owned that comes in our line. This is a 24/6, sometimes 24/7 facility. – [Host] Throughout the tour, the concept of continuous coil coating was expressed often, and it starts here, at the entry mandrels. There are two entry mandrels so that one can be loaded
as the other turns. When it’s time for the next coil to be painted, a stitch is made between the two coils so the line doesn’t have to stop. – So this is where we actually make a stitch, so when two pieces of metal come together, there’s a dye in there that joins them. – [Yusuf] So this is a two dye stage, that’s why we can run all the way from .016 aluminum to .060 steel. – [Host] In order to
make a successful stitch, the metal is run through a set of vertical rollers called
an accumulator tower that moves up and down to feed the rest of the line during a stitch. – So the whole reason we have the accumulator tower is so that, because this is a continuous operation, when the operator is making a stitch, only the entry section comes to a stop. The rest of the line, including the accumulator tower will continue to run. So that’s when the tower will start coming down, as he’s making a stitch. We run 400 feet per minute, which gives the operator seven seconds to make a stitch at that line speed. – [Host] After passing
through the entry accumulator, the metals hits a set of steering rolls that make sure the coil
is centered properly before entering the cleaning sections. – So we have six tanks. The first three tanks
are our cleaner tanks, where you remove all the debris, the oil, the rust, whatever the metal comes in with. The metal is cleaned, then it is rinsed from tank number four to tank number six. – It comes out of these cleaner tanks and it goes through a leveler. The leveler helps us
in deburring the metal if there are damaged edges, if there are any small dents in the metal. From the leveler, it
goes through a chemtreat. It’s one of the most important processes, because if there’s no chemtreat, then the paint and the
primer will not adhere to the surface of the metal. From the chemtreat it goes to chem oven, which we also call it an IR oven, where you dry the chemical. – [Host] After the infrared
oven heats the metal, the coil travels over a long span to allow the chemtreat to cure before applying primer. – [Yusuf] So this is the
first part of the process where primer is actually applied directly to the surface of the metal, like you see this is a
forward coating system, primer is picked up from the paint pan, it goes through the pick up rolls, it’s applied on the applicator roll, and the applicator roll is kissing it to the metal’s surface. The operators do a fabulous job at making sure that the thickness of the paint has to be just right, if not it’ll start
blistering in the ovens. – [Host] When a stitch comes through, an operator stands by to open the coater heads to allow the stitch to pass before applying paint on the next coil. The material used to stitch the coil is called a lead strip. It’s a piece of waste material that has to be long enough
to run the entire line, which takes around 10 to
15 minutes to get through. From the primer coater, the coil passes through a primer oven that cures the material. All the oven temperatures are set and monitored by the
quality control department to ensure constant repeatability. A quench tank sprays
deionized water on the metal to cool the material, before being centered
by another steering roll and entering the finish coater. Meanwhile in the finish room, operators are working quickly to make a paint change as
a stitch passes through. Paint choices are customer specified. The paint is agitated before it’s applied to the finish coater. Chemicals like titanium dioxide need this agitation, so the paint will stick to the metal. The operator tests the paint consistency and amount, then pumps it into the pan where the pickup roller can begin
the topcoat process. It’s important to get the topcoat consistency right, otherwise, it could ruin someone’s material. This is tested by quality control on every order. The metals enters another oven and set of quench tanks to cure the topcoat using convection heat and cool the material
with deionized water. The finish oven is similar
to the primer oven, but it has one extra zone to make sure the coil reaches peak metal temperature in order to cure fully. A final steering roll preps the metal for the exit accumulator, which is the same concept for
the entry accumulator, but works on the opposite cycle. The leads strip is removed from the coil before it’s wound on the rewind mandrel, and taken off the operation. Lastly, Yusuf took us into
the quality control lab to demonstrate how Metal Coaters maintains quality and consistency with every order. – All right, so this is again one of the most important steps in the processes that also essentially becomes one of the last lines of defenses to make sure that every coil that is painted in our facility is checked for all their physical properties of adhesion, all their paint properties to make sure the paint doesn’t crack, and it passes through all these tests that you have seen. In our process, we warranty our materials
somewhere between 10 years and 30 years, so, as a part of this process all those retain samples that you see are also kept for a period of 30 years before they’re discarded as a part of the process. – [Yusuf] So, every single test has a specific, you know, objective. So for example, when you do the T-Bend test, you are making sure that the paint, it does not deform or crack at the bends. And there are different kinds of bends, you have the one T, the two Ts. When you do the M-E-K test, that test tells you about if there’s enough chemtreat on it, and if the paint is already stuck
and bit into the primer, if not, it’ll start ripping off. When they do the impact test, that’s to make sure that the paint can handle that amount of force when applied on the material. There’s also a salt test, salt spray test that they do to make sure that the material does not corrode when it is exposed to
atmospheric conditions of UV radiation, when it’s exposed to salty air, if it’s installed on a
building next to an ocean. But, so, those tests
are again very specific, they are generally done
by the paint vendors to make sure the paint adheres
to all these standards. And here, the tests that we do, to make sure that the paint is within it’s color specification. So this meter shows that to you, make sure that it is not off color and there’s enough
repeatability in the process so if we paint six coils, all six of them will be exactly identical to the color that it produces under UV and all the other
atmospheric conditions. In this process, as you
see, you make a decision based on the sample that you get in the beginning of the coil and that’s industry standard. So, every coil that we test, and it goes through the line, that basically tells you how stringent the process on the line has to be to ensure that the end quality is as expected as by the customer. – [Host] And there you have it. If quality is at top of mind through painting coil, slitting material, rollforming panels, and every step it takes to manufacture a metal roof, you can be assured the end product will adhere to the same quality. Make sure you know where your material’s coming from and how it’s being painted. Huge thanks to Metal Coaters, and Luis, Yusuf, and Edward, for showing us around. Thank you for joining us here. Make sure you subscribe
to Metal Roofing Channel, comment down below with any questions, as always I’m Thad Barnette and I’ll catch you again next time. (upbeat electronic music)

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