How a Tippmann A5 Works

How a Tippmann A5 Works


Hey guys. Lord Odin here. Today we’re going over
the basic operation of the Tippmann A5 marker. Although the diagram shows an A5, the information can be applied to the X7
blowback, 98 Custom, and U.S. Army line of markers such as the Alpha Black,
Project Salvo, and Carver One. They may appear different on the outside but
on the inside the guts are almost identical and you may often find that the parts are
interchangeable from marker to marker, depending on the model. Some of you may already be familiar with
Meph’s animation, but I’ve painstakingly
converted it over to Flash so we can get a better understanding of the
mechanics of the marker. So let’s begin. Once a tank is connected to the ASA,
or Air Source Adapter, air will enter into the gas line and through the ASA plug. Air now enters the tombstone, where it is
funneled into a narrow channel prior to entering the valve. It goes through the valve o-ring and washer, around
the valve spring, and stops at the valve plunger. The plunger creates a seal against the valve
seat and prevents air from continuing through the marker. At this point, it is pressurized
and ready to fire. The marker won’t fire until the rear bolt, or hammer,
is released by the trigger. The hammer waits under tension by the compressed
drive spring inside of it but is held in place by the trigger sear. The drive spring pushes on the hammer and, in turn,
pushes on the sear. The operator squeezes the trigger, which rotates
around a pin, and lifts the front of the sear. The sear also rotates around a pin until the lip of it clears the hammer. Once that happens, multiple things happen simultaneously. The trigger sear is pushed backwards by the
sear spring and is reset, where it waits for the hammer to return. The hammer is connected by a linkage arm to
the front bolt and entire assembly moves together in unison by means of the drive spring
pushing on the hammer. As it moves forward, the entire
assembly builds up momentum. The front bolt is pushed forward and, in turn,
pushes the paintball into the detent. The detent folds downward, out of the way,
and the paintball passes through the barrel adapter, into the breech end of the barrel, followed by the front bolt. At the same time, the hammer enters the powertube
and the o-ring creates an airtight seal. The hammer then strikes the valve pin
on the valve plunger. It pushes the plunger forward and breaks the
seal inside the valve, allowing the air to escape. Air travels in two different
directions at this point. Firstly, it travels backwards into the cavity
created by the walls of the powertube, the face of the hammer, and the face of the valve. This is referred to as the blowback gas. This air builds up pressure
inside of this cavity and, combined with the valve spring, begins
to reset the marker by driving the hammer, linkage arm, and front bolt backwards. Secondly, air splits into two halves and turns
90 degrees on both sides of the valve. We’ll refer to this is the propellant gas to
differentiate it from the blowback gas. Here, the air, yet again, diverts into two directions. One way is through the side of the marker,
where air powers the Cyclone and Response Trigger. Both of which operate on the propellant gas; not the blowback gas that pushes back the hammer. The other way has the air turn 90 degrees
and channels it forward through four grooves located outside of the valve. If you have an older style A5 valve or Low
Pressure Kit valve, there will be 2 large grooves instead of 4 smaller ones. Once past the tombstone, the air converges
in a small pocket of the powertube, where it is then funneled into the powertube
small extension, which allows the front bolt to slide back and forth. The air travels through the extension, through the front bolt, and finally pushes
the paintball through the barrel. Now the marker has fired and needs to reset. At this point, hammer continues traveling backwards
until the valve plunger creates a seal against the valve seat again, cutting off air supply
to the marker. One the hammer o-ring clears
the end of the powertube, most of the gases expelled throughout the back
of the marker come from this small cavity. The momentum of the hammer continues to drive
it backwards and compresses the drive spring. The hammer slides over the sear until it slams
into the end-cap o-ring. It then travels forward again until the sear catches
the hammer and resets the sear. The marker is now ready to fire again. And that’s it! This may seem like a complex operation but
if you open up your degassed marker, study the parts, and move the assembly back and forth, you will
begin to understand what’s going on. Hopefully this video often will help in explaining
the marker’s operation, and will help you with things such as assembly,
maintenance, and upgrades. Stay tuned for future videos
and thanks for watching.

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