Gimp: Watercolor Painting With Self Made Brush.

Gimp: Watercolor Painting With Self Made Brush.


In this Gimp Workshop we are going go create
our own brush, and we will make a beautiful watercolor painting. If you want to follow along, the download
links for the images are in the description. We will start by making our watercolor brush. Open your image folder. Right click on the texture image, click open
with and then click Gimp. Maximize the image by clicking on the little
icon in the top right. Then we select the free select tool. We make a selection that looks interesting
to us, by following the shapes of the colors in the image. When we are close to our starting point, we
click in it and then we have our selection. Go to select and click invert. Then go to edit and click clear. Back to select and click none. Go to image in the menu bar and click mode. Select gray scale. Now we go to colors and then to brightness
and contrast. Decrease the lightness with 30 by clicking
three times on the line of the brightness slider. Increase the contrast with 30. Then click okay. Select the crop tool and crop out the brush. By click and drag the handles and or the corners
we can make corrections. By click and drag inside the selection we
can move the whole selection. Hit enter or click in the corner to apply. Now we are going to save our brush. Go to file and click export as. Here we have to find the location of Gimp
on our hard drive. In windows its usually installed in the folder
with our username. When we have found the Gimp folder, we open it, and then open the folder that is named brushes. Click select file type by extension and scroll
down to gimp brush animated. Select this GIH extension. Now double click on the name and type in your
brush name, for instance watercolor 1. Hit enter. In this dialog box we fill in the same name
as before and then we can click export. Close Gimp, click discard changes and reopen Gimp. And there it is, our own watercolor brush. We will use the image with the fox to make
a nice watercolor painting, but we can apply the same technique on the other example images too. But when you do, you might want to change
some of the settings, depending on the size and the content of the image, and of course to your own liking. Go to file, open and open the image of the fox. Click the little zoom icon to maximize the photo. Click filters in the menu bar, then enhance
and then click unsharp mask. Move the dialog box, place the cursor on the edge, and when you see it changing in a diagonal double arrow you can pull out the window. Make the image visible. Click the amount slider to around 1.50. Then click the preview to compare. Click okay. Now we go back to filters, click artistic
and then cartoon. Here too we move the dialog box aside, enlarge it, and move the picture to make the most important part visible. We change the percent black to around 0.4. Click the preview of and on. And when its to your liking, click okay. Go to the layers panel and click on the little
icon left below to add a new layer. We can give this layer a name, for instance
watercolor 1. Make the layer fill type white and click okay. Reduce the opacity just enough to see the
underlying image shining through. Time now, to activate our newly made brush. Go to the toolbox and activate the eraser tool. Choose our brush, and make its opacity around 50. Then enlarge the brush up to approximately
800. Hit dynamics, scroll down and click track
direction. This makes that the brush rotates when we
use it. Now we are going to click in our image and
we can see, that the underlying photo becomes more visible, the more we click. When we do this, we must try to make a pattern, that is darker on the center and lighter towards the edges of the picture. Clicking multiple times without moving the
mouse, makes that particular spot more visible. After a few clicks, we can change the opacity
of the watercolor layer back to 100 percent, and then we continue erasing with our brush. When we have made the center good visible
we can change the opacity of the brush to say 25 and continue working our way towards
the edges of our painting. Now select the smoke brush. Make the opacity 100 and the size 500. Erase some more. You can also move the brush while holding
the left mouse key, so you get a slightly different effect. Go to edit and click undo, to undo the last
action if necessarry. When we think it looks good, we go to the
toolbox again and select the pencil tool. Select brush splats 0.1, Slide the opacity down to around 50. Click dissolve for the mode. Then click the foreground colors
to make the color palette visible. Here we activate the eyedropper and we click
in a fairly dark brown area of the image. By current and old we can see if the color
is what we want. If not, we first have to click the eyedropper again and then we can click a new spot in the photo. Click okay. Make a few spots in the image. Change the foreground background colors so
we have white as our foreground color. Now make some more spots. Click the animated confetti brush and make
its size around 20. resets the foreground background colors so
we have black as the foreground color. Make the opacity around 80 and click a lot
of little dark specks. When you feel its okay, go to the bottom of
the layers panel and click the new layer icon. Rename it clothify. Leave the fill type white and click okay. Then we go to filters, artistic and clothify. Here we just click okay. Now go to the mode and change it to grain
extract. Then reduce the opacity to around 50 or whatever
looks good to you. And there we have it; a nice watercolor painting. I hope you enjoyed this video, thank you for
watching.

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