Games Workshop Easy To Build + Paint Sets Review

Games Workshop Easy To Build + Paint Sets Review


(chill electronic music) Hello and welcome back. Sleepy WhatsIt here, and I have another miniatures video for you. In today’s video we’re
going to be taking a look at a product line from Games Workshop and doing a bit of a product review of it. What we’re going to be looking at here is their Easy To Build
models + Paint Sets. Which are boxes that come
with a simple model sprue for one of the factions
or games that they’re for. And then a bit of paint and some brushes, so you can get started on ’em. So all these boxes are
kind of the same thing. There’s one for Stormcast Eternals, one for Nighthaunt, one for Ultramarines, and one for Death Guard. So I’m going to show you
what comes in the box, and then give you some of
my thoughts about if I think this is something worth buying. So the first box we have here is the Nighthaunt paint set. So we’re just having a little
bit look at the box here. You can see what we’re going to get here. We’re going to get four
models, a paintbrush, and six pots of paint. The pots of paint are
going to be 12mL size, so they are reasonably sized. So the box is part of the ad copy, has the instructions here, which is probably the
weakest part of these boxes. You can see here they’re
basically just saying the base is Celestra Grey, splash some Nighthaunt Gloom and work up using only
pictographs, not a lot of text. This is the extent of the instructions that come with these boxes. They’ll get you a serviceable model, they add a little bit of
a detailed photo here, and here like when I’m
talking about pictograms, like this is the extent
of the instructions. So just going to have to
get into the box here now. So as you can see here, there’s a bit of a plastic
tray with everything on it, and you can see the sprues
and the paints and paintbrush. So we’ll take a look
at these sprues first. These are the same sprues you get if you get the models seperately, except they’re just not coloured plastic because they’re Age of Sigmar ones, they have the nice
pre-textured bases and such, they’re perfectly fine for what they are. They’re monoposed. Here’s the starter brush as they call it, I think this is actually
a small layer brush that’s been re-labeled. Some of the other kits, like the 40K ones have what looks like a
medium layer brush instead because they’re a little
bit of a thicker point. It’s a perfectly serviceable brush for what you’re getting here. And then we have the six paint pots here. When I got these originally,
I was a little bit concerned that these were going to be
a bit dry, but, you know, they’re fully wet, so you
can see here that we have, they’re all 12mL bottles. The Nighthaunt Gloom, for
example, doesn’t normally come in a 12mL bottle. I’m just checking that
the paints are still good. Incubi Darkness, then we have Rhinox Hide, so most of these basically come with one technical/texture
paint, one shade, and four other paints. Like, your standard opaque paints. One of them is often a metal like, Lead Belcher, and then I think this one,
if I recall correctly, has something like Agrax
Earthshade for the shade. And as you saw with the
instructions, it’s basically telling you to base
everything and then shade it. There’s no complex highlighting
or anything like that going on here. So, that’s what comes in the box. Since these boxes are
kind of all the same, I’m going to just talk
over showing the contents of the rest of them. Well, just so that you can
see if you’re really hot for the Stormcast, or something, you can see what’s in those boxes while I’m kind of discussing my thoughts. So, I’m going to kind
of review these things from three kind of perspectives. One, is this good for someone
completely new to hobby? Two, is this good for someone new to this specific game or faction? And three, straight up are
these just cost effective? So, from the perspective of
someone that’s new to the hobby. I think these are, they’re
better than nothing, per say, but I don’t think they’re
a great starting point because of the lack of instruction. Because there isn’t a
lot of, they don’t have the instructions on how
to assemble the models. They’re like, you can see on
the back here, that there’s some instruction but they
don’t come with the pamphlet these models normally
have for construction. Yes, there are monoposed
models and they’re relatively easy to put together,
but there’s just a lot of little details, I
think, that are missed that they could’ve included in there. So, I think that’s a significant lacking. Also, they’re somewhat lacking in parts. The simple reality is that
you don’t have a sprue cutter or anything like that, it’s
going to make your life very difficult, like, without
instruction from someone else. This could be a good
thing to have for a class or something, as a base set to work with. But, I’m not sold on them
for a teach yourself, learn how to paint kit. Now, from the perspective
of if you want to get into Age of Sigmar or 40K or
these specific factions, I’m not going to comment on
the viability necessarily of these boxes for those
factions, because I’m not familiar with them enough to say, this is a good starting point, or not. But, I think if you have
some hobbyist knowledge but you don’t have any of these paints, I think it’s actually not necessarily the best thing in the world,
but it’s an interesting way to get started to give you
access to all of these things if you don’t already have some of them. So, I think there’s some
value in that perspective. But, again I’m not 100% sold
because of the fact that you end up with a very
specific combination here. Also, one of my little pet
peeves here is they call them no glue on the box, but when
you see when we get into the space marines and the
death guard here, these ones are tabbed with standard
GW bases which definitely are going to come apart. You have to glue those
together, I don’t think anyone would reasonably expect
you to put the tabbed bases or tabbed models in the bases and be happy with that. So, I think that’s a little
bit misleading in that regard. Now, I guess the third
lens to view this from is are they cost effective? Well, I think if you
have none of these paints and you want the paints and models, they are somewhat cost effective. I kind of did a cost
breakdown in Canadian dollars. So, the boxes cost $40 each. The models that normally
come in these, like these specific sprues are normally $20 each. 12mL bottles in Canada are like 5.40 on the Games Workshop store. You get six of them, so that’s
about $32 worth of paint. Again, if you get
multiples of these boxes, you’re going to have a
lot of overlap to them and things like that. The brush, if it is
actually the layer brush I think it is, is about an $8 or $9 brush. So, you’re looking at the
contents of the box is about 61 bucks, give or take, in Canadian. So, you’re getting close to
a 50% discount by buying it this way, or 50% more material
than if you were to buy the things individually
but you are also losing the instructions and you may
get a lot of duplication. Again, I can’t really
comment on the viability necessarily of these. I can’t necessarily
recommend these to everyone. They are interesting. Obviously I bought all
of them for the purpose of reviewing them and I’m
also intending on doing videos kind of working through to
address that lack of instruction side of things, since
some people may view these as a good way to get started. But, I think Games Workshop
especially has better ways to get into painting. If you are already a Games
Workshop game player, like you play 40K and you
want to try a new faction or you want to try Age of Sigmar, you probably have paints
and brushes already. I think it would make more
sense just to go and buy the cheap, easy to build models and save, because you’re not going to
get a lot of the benefits of the paints and brush
that come in there. And if you’re completely new to the hobby, I would probably put a little
bit more money into it. Games Workshop has a $50
box, that’s at least for 40K, that’s basically all the paints
that you would be getting from these two boxes, the brush,
and sprue cutters and glue. But it doesn’t include the
models, like it’s meant to be like a painting essentials kit. You can get that and buy the models, yeah, that’s going to be a
little bit more money. But it’s not going to
be much more than buying both of these boxes, and
you’ll have your sprue cutters and your glue. As I said, I think that’ll
be a better route to go. I don’t think it’s necessarily
a horrible way to go, and in general if you’re
getting into the hobby, like I got back into the
hobby by going through the Reaper learn-to-paint kits. I think from a pure
instructional on how to paint, those are better structured
because they have better instruction and a
little bit better materials that are included in them. Though it won’t necessarily
teach you the Games Workshop way of painting, and it’s
not going to give you things for your specific game. So that is my, I guess, my
very broad view of this. I think there is some
value in these, if they fit a niche for you very well, it
might be worth looking into. But I wouldn’t, if someone were to ask me how to get into painting
games like Age of Sigmar or Warhammer 40k, I probably wouldn’t be recommending these boxes to them. Just because they’re kind of
a weird mish-mash of things when it comes right down to it. And yeah, I’m going to have a lot about the Balthasar Gold and a
few other colours here, because pretty much
every one of these boxes had a copy of some of these paints. So hopefully I’ll be using
a lot of that in the future. Thank you for watching. I hope you enjoyed the video. If you found it informative,
please give the video a like. If you want to see more content like this, please subscribe to the channel. I put out miniatures videos weekly, and hopefully in the near
future, I’ll be doing some tutorial walkthroughs
of how to actually paint these kits. I look forward to seeing
you in the next one. (chill electronic music)

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