Essentials to Mixing Any Flesh Tone :: Painting Skin Colors

Essentials to Mixing Any Flesh Tone :: Painting Skin Colors


Hello, everyone and welcome back to the studio. This video is about skin tones. Now, the biggest thing to know about skin tones is there’s no, specific formula. All right, not even from the tubes that you buy in the stores, skin tone of each person, changes depending on the lighting and their environment every single time. In this video we’re going to cover four different cultures. First will be middle East, Second will be Africa, third is European, and Fourth is Asian. An important point to note about these skin tones is they’re not really all that different. You can make them up with yellow, red, blue, (burnt) sienna and white. Really, that’s all you ever need. So let’s get started, So, I’ve changed over to my palette so we get the working view of it all. Our first skin Tone will be for Middle Eastern. We use this photo to compare. My go to starter mixture is always on the dark side and here we have a little bit of ochre, yellow ochre. We’ll throw some cad red, some ultramarine blue, and some Burnt Sienna. And to start off the mix and I don’t start with [any] known Flesh tone Just straight into this and from there I can make decisions. Okay, I’m going to cool this off And the temperature of the shadow and the light will depend on the temperature of the light, correct? So if you have warm light, you’ll have cooler shadows, if you have cool light you know warmer shadows So throw a little bit of base blue, ultramarine blue in here Alright, we’ll start with this base So of course we need to add white to it. If you watch my other video You’ll know that anytime you add white you always have to adjust it again So this time [we’re] going to throw in a little bit of red just to get some warmth back Because we do have blood under neither skin And back to our reference and put this here on the cheek you can see Immediately, I’ll bring it up [alright] the value is off so I added too much white. So, I can just go in and adjust it with either my previous mixture or throw in some Burnt Sienna [or] Something like that So I’m going to try it one more time adjusting the value and it’s close. I think it just needs [to] cool off a little bit So we’re not thinking about making a blue-er, or yellow-er, or a green-er, or orange-er, Okay, I’m thinking about making it COOLER. Now we’ll put that on as a sample Bring it out, and I’d say we’re pretty close for that section Alright this time we’re going to work African skin. From here, I’ll probably start with a (Burnt) Sienna is the skin pigmentation is a little bit darker. Throw in some ultramarine blue or any blue could be Cobalt blue Throw in some red because we have blood and it’s warm And you can see what a nice rich color that is And let’s bring the subject in. There we are… and we’ll use this mixture, let’s say on the cheek here Let’s have a look It’s very close. I would say the temperature is a bit (too) warm And, maybe, possibly a tad dark. So I’ll throw in a bit of white And if you just add a little bit of white you may not have to adjust The chromacy (chroma) of that [I] think we’re a bit bit warm so throwing a bit ultra And really I think that’s I think we have it. You can really see how easy it is to make skin tones right. Bring subject back in… Apply a… little Mixture The one on the right on your cheek is the mixture I just mixed and I think that’s the better match All right, now. Let’s go to something a little bit brighter like Her cheek here all right, so I’ll put this original mixture up here You can use a bit of it and just add a lot of white Because we are going for value first. Remember value, value, value. It doesn’t matter what color the skin is [at] that point? You gotta stick with the value first All right mix that up there. Let’s get the value put it on here just [a] little glitch there that messed up Put the value on, you know what? That value is really close Put it on different spots, so you can see it That’s a little better. That value is really, really close, and so I would probably paint with that. I really like that. Next on the docket is European. What’s really interesting about the European is the highlight on the African could possibly even be… Alright that nose color right there. It’s a little bit cooler So [we’ll] take this will maybe warm it up a bit. That might have been too much. We’ll see Now I’ll adjust the value a little bit, but moving back to that area, on that nose… No, it matches the value bang on and the temperature isn’t bad either. So you can see we can take the highlight of an African skin put it on kind of a [mid-tone] on the nose of a European skin. So you can see Skin tones aren’t really that much different when you’re just thinking value and temperature solely. Next we’re moving to the Asian culture and you can see from this photo we can pretty much use already the same Tones from various, that might be a bit dark, From the various cultures we’ve had already. [so] really we’re all primarily the same. Maybe we’ll take this value over here Apply it in here See it’s a bit light so we could easily adjust that if you want take that premix that you’ve had before Darken it up slightly So that you can see that there is a difference between these two [alright] original darker Clean this up here. Put this up top. I’m going to try this on our skin now And you can see from that swatch the tempera… I mean the value is pretty much bang on. Temperature-wise I think would you go and cool it a little bit but for the sake of the painting, I’d be putting this in and using it direct So you can see, with any culture that you’re painting, whether it be Middle Eastern, European, Asian or African Really all you need to do, is work [with] your yellow, red, blues, and maybe a Burnt Sienna Getting the value first is 100% what you need to do if it’s dark, or if it’s light And then [you] need to adjust that if it’s warmer and in either case, or for example Maybe you need to make a cooler, in which case you can add a blue [or] a green Right. So here we have the neutral, warmer, cooler In this instance for the lips, even warmer still each one is relatively warmer to the next or cooler to the next. This original neutral color is actually quite a Lot more cool than this mixture and this mixture is a lot more cool than this mixture Conversely, this mixture is a lot hotter than this mixture, this mixture is a lot hotter than this mixture. [alright] And this mixture is a lot hotter than this mixture if we look at the cool side. So to summarize again, Really stick with your value first, value is key, decide on your value Then adjust your temperature using reds, blues… reds and yellows or blues and greens and you will have no trouble Matching skin tones. It’s not the color. It’s the value and the temperature. I hope this helps some of you out there when you’re mixing your skin tones. If it does, please share and like the video every bit of help counts and Please don’t forget to subscribe. Thank you

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