EASY WATERCOLOR BACKGROUNDS with watercolor markers!

EASY WATERCOLOR BACKGROUNDS with watercolor markers!


– [Kristina] Hi everyone, Kristina here, welcome to another video at
my Youtube channel and blog. In this video I’m going to be showing you some fun ways to use watercolor
markers on backgrounds, specifically doing an
ink smooshing technique or even just water smooshing. So I’m using some Arteza
watercolor brushes, you can get these on Amazon
for super inexpensively, especially if they’re on sale. And I’m going to be using them on Strathmore Bristol
cardstock or Bristol paper. Now you could do this on watercolor paper, but I find that the Bristol paper allows the colors to be picked up a little bit more and reactivated. So it’s a different look. I started out by cutting a piece of Bristol paper into four sections and then taping them down to a hardboard. This is going to keep them nice and flat or relatively flat while I’m working. And I’m going to be using
a clear transparency sheet, or some acetate, for all of the smooshing. So I’m using three different colors of like bluish green shades and I’ve kind of just scribbled onto the clear transparency or acetate and I’m going to spritz
that with some water. I’m using a distress spray, but you could use any
spray bottle for this, especially since this technique doesn’t necessarily depend
on the quality of the spray, you just wanna get some
water onto that marker ink. Smooshing that down onto my Bristol paper, then I’m gonna use my fingertips to sort of spread the color around, get it moving a little bit. Now my original thought
with this is I would just leave that transparency
on there and let it dry. So I did let it sit for
about a minute or two, but then I realized
that the Bristol paper, because it was wet, was starting to swell and kind of pull away from the hardboard. So it was kind of
puffing up in the center. And that was making the transparency sheet pull away from the edges
and I was going to be getting some weird lines soon. So I decided to go ahead and just pull up that transparency sheet. And I dried my watercolor piece here and I’m gonna do another layer. So I added a little bit more marker and I’m gonna press it right on. So basically what I did
that first time around I’m just adding it to
some additional sections on this piece. And you can also use whatever’s leftover and kinda press it down and get some more dry looking splotches. So that’s one particular
ink smooshing technique, very similar to what
I’ve done in the past. And now for just a twist
on that whole idea, I’m gonna play with the
placement of the colors. So for this particular example, I’m using three different colors sort of getting like a
striped ombre effect. I’m gonna use purple on the very bottom, red in the center, and more of a pinkish purple near the top. And I’ve left a little bit of a gap in between the colors so
that they don’t mix too much after I spray it and have
to turn this sheet over. So I’m tipping it over and I’m making sure that I turn it so if
there’s any colors running they will stay within their colors. And then I press that down
onto my Bristol paper. I’m gonna smoosh that
around with my fingertips, try to get those colors
to mix just a little bit. But they were quite a bit apart, they did have quite a bit
of gap in between the colors so in order to kind of remedy that, I decided I would go ahead and do some additional layers of color. So I put some pink marker
onto that transparency sheet, spritzed it with a little bit of water, and then turned that over and placed that right over that white gap in between the pink and red. And it didn’t fully get rid of that gap, but it did fill in a lot of that color, give it a little bit more shading. I did the same with the purple and this really got the
purple and red mixing. And I also got to press down
a little bit more that pink. So I’m gonna lift this up
off of my Bristol paper here, you can see that it
sort of mixed the colors a little bit better this time. I set those two aside to dry and on this particular example, I’m first going to go
straight onto the paper. So I put down some of that green, scribbled quite a bit, and now I’m using a water brush. And I just squeezed that water brush until some water dripped out of the brush and so I had a little more water on there than you normally would. And that really helped spread and move that color
across the Bristol paper. Using a brighter kind of lime green, I’m gonna do the same. And I did not clean my brush
off in between these colors since they were close enough in color. This third color I’m going
to add is a bright yellow. And I am going to make sure
that I clean off my brush when I go into kind of
spread this color around, because I realized pretty quick that that color was still on my brush. And like you guys have
heard me say in the past, protect the yellow. If you have any yellow in
your watercolor pieces, be really careful with the yellow. You wanna make sure that it doesn’t get lost in all the other colors and it can very easily get lost, so protect the yellow. So I just smooshed that around, try to get those colors going. I’m gonna let that air dry for a minute while I work on this other example. So for this time, I’m gonna go back and
play with placement again. Starting out with yellow in the center of that transparency sheet, I’m gonna take an orange and
go around the outer edge, kind of in a circular pattern. And then I’m gonna take
kind of a coraly pink shade and I’m gonna add that on the
outside ring of the orange. So my idea for this is I
wanted to have a yellow center with some more intense colors going to the outer edges of the Bristol paper. So I’m gonna take my distress sprayer, or my spray bottle, and get this nice and wet. Then I’m going to tip this over and press it down onto my Bristol paper. So for the most part, it did keep that yellow
right in the center and it does give me a really interesting color variation all the way across this. But I did think that I needed
more color around the edges, even more color. Just because it kind of went to a white and it was really, really stark. So I actually am gonna peel this up, you’ll be able to see how it added a little bit of interest
right across the center. And I’m going to dry both of these. I’m going to do additional layers of water or color on top so I needed to make sure
that the underlayer, or the first layer, was completely dry. So I covered up that first piece with some paper towel just to protect it while I do this spraying
and things like that. And I took a red shade that’s even darker than that coral color that
was on the outside edge before and I only applied it to the outer frame of this transparency sheet. I’m gonna take my spray bottle and add just a little bit of water, I don’t want too much
’cause I don’t want it to kind of pool and streak
all the way across this piece. So I’m gonna press that down and you can see that it just added some darker red to the outer edges. You can see how much that paper kind of pulls up from the center, even though it’s taped down. You can see that it’s
pulling all of that color. Let that sit for a minute and then I pulled up
the transparency sheet. And that’s how you get kinda those lines, that really cool kind of outer hard edges. So for the yellow and green piece, I’m actually not gonna put
any color on the transparency, I’m going to go straight in with water ’cause we already have all that color down onto the Bristol paper. So I’m just going to use
the particular feature of these watercolor brushes, which is that they are
reactivated with water. So I just have water on
that transparency sheet, I’ve not added any additional color. I’m gonna pull this up and you can see how it gives you this really fun kind of water spot or
water staining effect. I’m gonna hit that with my heat tool, both of these, so that they dry. And I’m gonna add just a little bit more onto the green and yellow piece. I did not add any additional color onto the transparency sheet, I’m just using the residual
moisture that was left behind and I’m pressing that down
onto the background once again. There was a little dry on this time so I added a little
more water to that sheet and then pressed that down
onto the Bristol paper. So I’m really loving the organic look of all of these patterns, I think it’s really fun. And if you struggle with some
different ways to kind of let go and have really random
watercolor backgrounds, this is a great way to do that. Because it does give you some
structure with technique, but you get really great
organic looking results. So I’ve removed these
backgrounds from the hardboards and I have four really
great watercolor backgrounds all in different color combinations. I’m gonna take the pink and purple one and I’m gonna cut it
down to a square piece and then I’m gonna use some new products from Simon Says Stamp. This is the modern flowers card wrap and I’m gonna show you how I use it to create a fun card wrap for this card. So in order to actually use the card wrap, you’re gonna cut two
pieces of white cardstock and it doesn’t really matter the length on them at this point, you just wanna make sure the height is four and one quarter. This half circle design is
exactly four and one quarter tall so you wanna make sure
that it’s the same length. I use my T-square ruler to
draw on a straight line, this is gonna help me
make sure that the edge of this card wrap is
the right orientation. So I put it into my Big Shot machine and I’m gonna run that through and I did this twice so
that I have two pieces. And I get a really good cut
this way when I run it through. If I turn it the other direction and have it go through the
center of my Big Shot machine, I think my cutting pads
are a little warped and so I don’t get as good of a cut. So I just kinda play with the placement. I’m now using the hello
beautiful gorgeous die set, this is also a new die from Simon and I just cut that out
of the same cardstock. This carstock I’m using
today for the wite pieces is Nina Classic Crest Solar
White 80 pound cardstock. And I did the 80 pound just because it was a little bit easier to
cut that really intricate die. So now I’m cutting off the extra that’s on the side of these card wraps and I left about a quarter of
an inch past the score line. This die does give you a score line so that you can fold down the flap and it gives you the perfect area for adhering it to the
rest of the card wrap. So I just use my fingertips and help to get that score line going. And then I took some tape. This is some Express It tape from Copic and it’s a really, really strong adhesive and it fits perfectly on that
quarter inch tab or fold. So I have another piece of cardstock that’s cut to four and a quarter tall, but this time the width
is four and one eighth. This allows both of those flaps to come in and meet right in the center. Because there’s a little bit
of that fold on the wrap, it takes up a little bit of that distance. So again, the width on this center panel is actually four and one eighth. And that makes is so
those two half circles meet right in the center. The card I’m making today
is actually four by four. So if we think about it, the center panel on the
wrap is four and one eighth, the card is one eighth
inch smaller than that, so it is four by four. I adhered my watercolor piece and then I adhered my greeting die cuts using some Ranger
multi-medium matte adhesive. And I just use some
tweezers to hold the die cut while I apply little dots of glue and then I press that down onto the card. In order to close this card wrap you could wrap some ribbon around it or anything you want, some string. I’m using some chunky
twine from Doodlebug. This came out awhile ago, I’m not sure if it’s still available, but I really love how chunky it is. So that card can slide in
and out of this card wrap, it’s a really fancy way
to dress up your card. And I like that all that color
underneath shows through. So today I showed you four different ways to use some watercolor markers
on some background pieces. Hope you guys enjoyed it. Please check out the supplies
section down below with links for where you can purchase
everything I’ve showed you today. Thank you so much for watching and I’ll catch you guys in
another video very soon. (light music)

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