Color Theory: Mixing Paint Colors : Color Theory: Changing Color Temperature

Color Theory: Mixing Paint Colors : Color Theory: Changing Color Temperature


See, that’s a far better green. So you’d need
to realize if you want to make a red-orange, you want to go with a brighter red, not a
darker red. Again, in reds there’s usually an elliseran [phonetic], which is going to
be a cool red. And crimsons and scarlets are going to be hot reds or orange-reds, and they’re
going to be over here. And if you’re going to mix something between here and here, you
want the red that’s closer to orange. If you get the red closer to blue, then you’re going
to end up with a muddy orange. So that’s how those things work. And just to finish off
the color wheel, I’m just going to add a couple colors that you often use. Cerulean is a very
good color, it’s lighter, but it’s a good blue for skies. You know, if you’re going
to do lots of landscape you want to buy cerulean blue. And I did mention also the part about
when you mix colors they get duller. This is a commercially mixed color. This is a light
purple. It’s purple, if they mixed a purple pigment with white pigment. That is probably
far brighter than anything I can come up with and it’s still lighter than your basic violet.
Pinks are the same. If you want a bright flower pink, go to the store and buy one. Every time
you mix, you’re going to dull it down. And when you know, some of the pigments that are
used are really bright and beautiful. If you want to fuchsia, go buy it.

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