Basic Oil Painting Techniques : Choosing Paints for Oil Painting

Basic Oil Painting Techniques : Choosing Paints for Oil Painting


On behalf of Expert Village my name is Vince
Fazio and I’m here to talk to you from the Sedona art center about one session oil paintings.
Basically, you don’t need a lot to do painting, but you can end up with a lot, but I’m going
to go through some basic stuff. For a basic palette, I tend to like cool blue colors,
I use a lot of blues. I have ultra marine blue, which is the coolest blue, it has a
bit of a purple to it, cobalt blue. I use a Sicilian blue hue, which is great for skies,
it’s a bit like manganese blue, not as toxic though. So there’s a number of blues. A traditional
palette, a full spectrum palette will have two blues, two reds, and two yellows, so you
have a cool and a warm of each of the primary colors. That was cadmium red light, which
is the warm red, alizarin crimson will be the cool red. And I’m keeping this palette
pretty limited, so I’m not going to have a real cool yellow. This is cadmium yellow light,
and then I’m going to go right to orange. The white is titanium white, and I am going
to add one other color, which is viridian. Viridian is going to be the one green, but
I mainly use it to make black. Mixing it with the alizarin crimson will create a black,
and you get a variety of blacks that way. You get a black that’s a little more green
or a little more red, a little more warmer or cooler. Titanium white, and we need mineral
spirits with that. We need a razor knife is great for cleaning the palette. I’m using
a glass palette. That’s a very smooth palette. You can clean it off in the middle of a session
and start over.

2 Comments

  • polymath7 says:

    Ultramarine is not the coolest blue; it's the warmest.

  • polymath7 says:

    Yes, but purple is adulterated with red. a warm color- in fact the warmest. The other blues tend slightly toawrad green, which is of course blue adulterated with yellow; ergo all the other blues are cooler..

    It's also worth mentioning to the novice that ultramarine is a pigmet with the very worst brushing and handling proprties. When used on its own it tends to be stringy rather than buttery and will tend to produce streaky burushstrokes.
    I recommend using cobalt instead when possible.

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