Applying Milk Paint (Woodturning How-to)

Applying Milk Paint (Woodturning How-to)


Hi, I’m Mike with Craft Supplies USA and today we’re going to show you how to use Milk Paint. More and more turners are using color to add a unique look to their pieces. Adding multiple layers for a distressed look, or bright color to a box to liven it up are just a couple examples. Color can have a huge impact on the mood and the style of a piece. We like Milk Paint for its vintage look at how customize-able it is. You can get different effects by changing the thickness of the mixture, layering it iand puting finish on top of it. And when left in it’s powdered state, it lasts almost indefinitely, so we just mixed up small batches when we need it. I’m going to add a thin mixture to the outside rim of the bowl here that will give it a nice contrast while still allowing the grain to show through. Measure out a ratio of two parts water to one part Milk Paint. I like to use warm water as it seems to mix a little better, and a mason jar is perfect for mixing small batches. Stir it thoughoughly to break up the large chunks, then screw the lid on and shake it well. Now we’ll let it sit for about 20-30 minutes. Now poor the mixture into a small bowl using cheesecloth to strain out any chunks. It’ll be quite thin and that’s exactly what we want. Use a foam brush, or a synthetic bristle brush to paint it on the work piece. Moisten the brush first with water so the paint flows out better and shoot for a nice, even coat. It’s okay if the paint bleeds over a bit, we’ll turn that away after it’s dry. And don’t worry if there are a lot of bubbles on the surface. You can get rid of those by lightly brushing the surface with the tip of a dry paintbrush, while the paint is still wet. Once the paint is dry, the surface is probably going to feel pretty rough and that’s because the water and the paint has raised the grain. Sand paper will be too aggressive for our thinned paint, so instead use a brown paper sack to burnish and smooth the surface. From here you can add more coats, but keep in mind with each coat the green become more obscured, so for this piece we’re going to stick with one coat. Once the paint is dry and burnished smooth, we’ll make a final cleanup cut on the rest of the bowl. This creates a nice crisp line without having to tape off areas when painting. In its raw state, Milk Paint has somewhat of a chalky appearance, but by adding a finish like wax, shellac or oil, it will take on deep luster. For this piece, I’m going to apply a tung oil, but make sure the paint cures over night before doing this step. This piece is all done. I really like that the paint doesn’t obscure the wood grain and it adds a nice contrast. Let’s take a look at some other pieces we used Milk Paint on that have a completely different effect. This piece has two layers of different colored paints. It has a black base in a barn red top coat. The top coat was sanded through in random areas to give it an aged, well-worn effect. For this next piece, a black base was applied, followed by a coat of Antique Crackle and lexington green and that gives this piece a really unique look. Well that wraps up this project how to. I hope you picked up some new ideas in adding color to your turnings with Milk Paint. It’s easy to use and it’s a ton of fun to experiment with. If you liked the video, subscribe to our channel and give it a thumbs up and be sure to check out our entire selection of woodturning supplies at www.woodturnerscatalog.com.

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